05/30/2018: Copy Cataloging of Foreign Language Materials

05/30/2018: Copy Cataloging of Foreign Language Materials


Post:
Everyone, it is 10:00, so I will go ahead
and get us started. Good morning. I’m Taylor Post,
SWFLN’s office manager, and I would like to welcome you
all to today’s webinar, “Copy Cataloging of Foreign
Language Materials,” and today’s presenter,
Maurine McCourry. Maurine McCourry, MLIS, PhD, was a catalog librarian
and reference librarian at Oberlin College
from 1995 to 2000 and has been a technical
service librarian at Hillsdale College
for the past 18 years. Her responsibilities
at Hillsdale for all of those years
have included the supervision of acquisitions,
collection development, and cataloging of all
monographic and AV material and the management
of libraries’ Innovative ILS. On her time off
from Hillsdale, Maurine teaches a course in knowledge
and organization online for the Dominican University. Please welcome Maureen and enjoy
her webinar this morning. McCourry: Hi, everybody.
Thanks very much, Taylor. It’s great to be with you. Thank you for having me. I want to start off
just by asking if any of you have attended
any of my other webinars having to do
with copy cataloging. Some of the stuff I’m going
to be talking about today, I’ve talked about
in previous webinars. Okay. Great. Hi, Natalie. So it might sound
a little familiar to you. And I’m kind of going to
start from the assumption that you have an idea
of what copy cataloging is: basically, the using of another
library’s MARC record in your own cataloging, so searching for cataloging
that’s already been done, that matches the item
you’re cataloging. I should ask, too, and I was
going to ask this later, but I think I’ll
start off by asking: What is your source
for cataloging copy? Do most of you use OCLC or do
you use something like SkyRiver or do you have other sources
for cataloging copy? Do you go to OCLC Connexion
or…? Looks like a lot of OCLC.
[laughs] I think that, yep,
that’s the standard, and that’s what we use,
too, at Hillsdale. Aleph. Okay. So, all of my references are
to searching OCLC’s WorldCat for cataloging
for MARC records, but I think that the principles
are going to apply in any system that you use. Wow, lot of OCLC, great. Okay, so let’s get started. I have to remember how
to advance the slides. There we go. [laughs] Goals today are several
and I want to mention, too, that I would love if you would
all keep on contributing and asking questions while
I’m doing the presentation. I’ll try to keep an eye
on the chat window and I’ll try to answer
questions as they come up and, if I miss something,
feel free to remind me [chuckle] that I didn’t answer
your question. Okay. So our first goal
is going to be to identify
the unique challenges of cataloging material
in languages that are foreign to you. There are challenges
with cataloging of all types and with copy cataloging,
specifically, but, when you’re working
with materials that are in a language
that’s not your own, a language that you don’t speak,
that you don’t know, the challenge is multiplied,
obviously, but they are not
insurmountable. When I first started this job, there was a backlog of material
in German, specifically. Everybody was kind of scared
to catalog the German material. I don’t think they
really needed to be. I did have a little bit
of German background, so it was pretty easy for me, but I think there are ways
to catalog material, even when you don’t
have any knowledge of the language of the material
you’re cataloging, so we’re going to talk
about what those challenges are and how you can
overcome some of them. We’re going to learn
what you need to look for to catalog different
types of material, so what you need
to look at on the item, in order to find copy
that matches, the main places
that you can start to look for search terms,
essentially, for finding copy. Along the same lines,
we’re going to explore ways to search for copy
when you don’t recognize the language,
or even the alphabet, so this happens quite a bit, especially when we get gifts
into my library, get something I won’t
even have a clue what alphabet is being used. Everything is completely
foreign to me and so, first, I will look for a number, to see if there’s a number that
I might be able to search on, and then I’ll start
trying to identify the alphabet that’s being used and the language that’s
being used on that item, but there are tricks
to doing that and so we’re going to go
through some of those. And then I’m also going to
suggest some areas that you might want
to edit in a MARC record to make that cataloging copy for
these foreign-language materials useful to all your users,
whatever their language is. I come from an academic
library in the Midwest. Most of our users
are English speakers, but, in a public library,
especially in Florida, a lot of your users are not
going to be English speakers and so making the MARC records
that you have usable for everybody, there are
some ways you can do that, whatever you’re cataloging,
but especially when you’re cataloging
materials in languages other than English. Okay. Let’s see if I can go
to the next slide. There we go. Okay. So we’re going to start
with the unique challenges of cataloging materials in
languages other than your own, foreign-language
copy cataloging. First is just identifying
the language, figuring out what language the item that you’re
cataloging is in. That can be a little tricky, if you’re not familiar
with languages. It gets easier. After a couple of decades
of doing copy cataloging myself, I’ve come to recognize
languages and alphabets a little bit more easily,
but, when I first started this, I had no clue
what Czech looked like, what Portuguese looked like,
even what Arabic looked like, and you get a little
bit more familiar with that kind of thing,
but you can — Even if you have no knowledge
of these other languages, there are ways to identify them. Similarly with alphabets. In fact, alphabets can be
a little bit more challenging. If you’re looking at something
that’s in another language, but it uses the Roman alphabet,
the alphabet we use in English, it’s pretty easy to figure out, to find cognates
and to find a translation, but, when you’re looking
at an alphabet that is not the alphabet
you’re used to, you don’t even know
what those letters are. And so finding out what
alphabet you’re working with and how that alphabet compares
to the Roman alphabet is another challenge. Locating the title page. Not every alphabet,
not every language, reads left-to-right,
the way we do in English. A lot read right-to-left, and so the title page
might be in a place that you don’t expect it to be
[laughs] on some material in a language
other than your own, so figuring out
where the title page or where the chief
source of information or the primary preferred source
of information and RDA language, where that preferred
source of information is can be a challenge. I think it’s very important,
when you’re doing cataloging in languages
other than English and cataloging in English, too, but it becomes
especially important in foreign-language cataloging
to understand how initial articles
are treated in a MARC record and how users search for titles
with initial articles, with “an” or “the” or other languages’ equivalents
to those articles, how those are indexed
in your systems and how your users can
and can’t find them. Understanding how those work
will help you make your materials
more findable. Distinguishing the parts
of the item. So, along with just finding that
preferred source of information, that title page
or front of a disc or whatever it may be,
figuring out what’s on that source of information
can sometimes be a challenge, if you’re working
with a language that is not your own. Figuring out exactly what the
title is and who the author is, what characters on that
source of information represent these things,
can be a challenge. And then identifying
what format the item is in. This is important
for video recordings. Video recordings are released
in formats specific to the area
in which they were produced. So, American videos
don’t necessarily play on European DVD players,
for instance. This is becoming
a little less of an issue. More and more videos are being
produced in region-free formats and more and more players
are region-free, but it’s still an issue. The cheapest DVD players
that you can get will only play one region,
typically. A lot of even computer programs
that you can use to play DVDs will play only one region,
so it’s important to know what region the item
you’re cataloging is in so that you can represent
that to your users and so they can find the format
that they’ll be able to use. So we’re going to go
through all of that. Start out, the supereasy way
to identify the language you’re working with is
Google Translate, free website,
translate.google.com. You just come to this page. In this box right here
in the center, you can enter text
of any sort, any language, and it will give you
a translation, kind of a rough
translation, usually, but it will also tell you what
language that text you typed is. If you have this detect
language dropdown chosen, and it’s chosen by default, if you leave that chosen
and you type in some text, the program will actually tell
you not only the translation — So there’s “Cantos Fluminense.” I cannot pronounce Portuguese. Is translated into English and it’s also identified
as Portuguese. I was not sure. I’ve become, as I said,
a little bit more familiar with the differences
between Spanish and Portuguese as I’ve been cataloging, but I
would not know just right off, “Oh, this is Portuguese.
This is not Spanish.” But putting this into Google, just these two words
into Google Translate, I’m able to see, “Oh, yes.
This is a Portuguese title.” Very, very helpful website for copy cataloging
of foreign-language materials. Another very helpful website
is in Wikipedia, the Wikipedia List
of Writing Systems, and so if you have
something in an alphabet that is unfamiliar to you. This is — Especially
with Asian alphabets. I do not speak, I do not read,
any of the Asian languages, and so it’s hard
for me even to know what language is represented
by various alphabets. This page is very, very helpful. It has little examples
of the characters. It’s a little hard
to see in this image. It’s a long list. This is just a very small part
of the list on this page, but there are little pictures
that you can identify, and so if you have
an item that you can see if some of the characters
that are on the item you’re trying to catalog
are in this list. In fact, if you scroll down or if you mouse over some
of these pictures, you’ll get a blown-up
version of it and so you can see
a little bit more clearly, “Do the characters on the item
I’m trying to catalog match any of the characters
on this page?” And, once you’re able
to identify the alphabet that you’re looking at, you’ll also be able
to identify the language and you’ll have a clue
as to how to look for copy that might match the item
you’re cataloging. As I said, feel free
to ask questions as I go, if you have any. Transliteration is basically
the representing of something in one alphabet,
in another alphabet. So when we try to represent
something in, say, Chinese, in the Roman alphabet, we’re doing what’s
called romanization. We’re changing those
Chinese characters into an alphabet we can read. We’re not translating. We’re not changing the words, but we’re representing,
basically, the sounds that are represented by the
characters in the other language in a alphabet
that’s recognizable to us as English speakers or speakers
of a Romance language. ALA for — This is actually about a century
[laughs] that ALA and L.C. have come up with what they call
romanization tables, so these are the standards
by which you do romanization, according to
Library of Congress standards. So if you catalog according to
Library of Congress standards, as most of us do in the U.S.,
you’ll want to use these tables, if you want to transliterate
something in another alphabet into the Roman alphabet. If you’re doing copy cataloging,
being able to transliterate the characters that you see
on the item you’re cataloging into the L.C. standard
of romanization will help you find copy
for that item. If there’s no — For instance, there’s no ISBN, there’s no publisher number
that you can match, you can transliterate
the characters in the item you’re cataloging. Once you’ve identified that
alphabet and that language, you can come to these tables
and figure out what Roman characters might be,
say, in WorldCat, representing the characters
you’re seeing on the item. So this is another
long list of tables. If you were cataloging,
for instance, something that was
in Greek characters, you would click
on this link here. It would take you to a PDF
of the Greek romanization table, ALA-L.C.
Greek romanization table, and so the characters
that you saw on the item, if you saw this little
triangle character, you would know that,
in the Roman alphabet, that is represented by a D. And so you could go through
in kind of like a — [laughs] What comes to mind is
the “Christmas Story,” where he gets the code,
so he can figure out what the “Little Orphan Annie”
code is [laughing] from his Ovaltine
and he goes through and he has these symbols
and he has to translate it, to cipher it. You would do the same thing
with the item you’re cataloging. You would take these characters and transliterate them
into Roman characters and then you would use that
Roman word that you came up with to search for the title
in your source of MARC records. Figuring out
what the title page is of something in a language
that you’re not familiar with or an alphabet
you’re not familiar with can sometimes be a challenge. This looks pretty normal. This is a Hebrew bible. That’s pretty obvious,
just from the cognates of the Roman title
that’s given here, but it’s actually in Hebrew. Most of this is in Hebrew. Hebrew does not read
left-to-right as English does. It reads right-to-left
and so even though this is — You have the spine
over here on the left, as we would expect
for an English-language book, when you open this book
up, though, what you see in the first, what we would consider
the first few pages, in the English-speaking world,
is actually the end of the book. So where you would actually
find the title page is where English readers
would expect to find the end of the book, toward what we would think of
as the back of the book. So here’s the title page. You see the spine
over here on the right and, when you turn the page, then you find
the title page first, so, then you find your ISBN
down at the bottom and some dates and some
publication information. So it’s not hard, but it
sometimes can throw you off when you open the book
and where you expect to see a title page
and a title page first, so it’s in the opposite
of what you would expect. Something to keep in mind. This is a book
that a colleague of mine picked up for my daughter
in Japan last summer and, when you look at this book, you hold it like
you would an English book. You see it’s actually
the back of the book. You do have some clues here. This particular item, you have
an ISBN in Arabic characters. You have these UPC codes and so there’s a lot to search
right there, but it’s still. It’s not in the place
you would expect. This is the back of the book
even though the spine here is over on the left. The front of the book, now,
the spine is over on the right and this is the front
of the book. Where we
in English-speaking world would expect to have
the back of the book is actually the front
of the book. Of course, we have a bunch of
clues on this particular item. There are Roman characters. There is English language
on this, but you might not have that
on something you’re cataloging. [laughing] Might not have nearly
as much to work with on a Japanese item you were
cataloging for your library. And this is the title page,
of course, what we would think of
as the back of the book. And a title page first, so. Again, with some clues, some English-language clues
that help us out. Even though this was
a Japanese-published item purchased in Japan,
there are still some clues to help us [laughing] in the
English-speaking world. So you’ll find that in a lot
of cases, but not always. The initial-articles question,
like I said, I do think it’s very important to understand
how initial articles work. I think I’ll ask here, too: What integrated library
systems are you using? What catalog systems
are you using? We use Innovative Interfaces’s
Sierra at Hillsdale and I’ve actually used — Okay. Polaris is similar. I’ve used Innovative
through most of my career and so a lot of [laughing]
what I talk about, in terms of cataloging is very
much from that standpoint. Gosh, we have a lot
of systems represented. Great. So every system treats initial
articles slightly differently. The MARC record treats
initial articles uniformly. You have indicators
that help you index items the way that
they need to be indexed, but then the way that your users
actually search for those items, for those,
in those MARC records, is different
with different systems. In the Innovative system,
user-type searches, by default, do not include initial articles, so, if a user searched
for this book, typing in the title
as a title search, “The Profane, the Civil,
& the Godly,” the system would actually
read that search as not including
that initial “The.” It’d read the search
as a search for “Profane, the Civil,
& the Godly.” That becomes a problem with
titles like “A Is for Apple,” a children’s alphabet book
called “A Is for Apple,” where A and the space
following it are actually part of the title. It’s not an initial article. The Innovative system,
in its default state, would drop off that A
and that initial article. The MARC record would have
included that A and the first space
as part of the indexed title, so the title would actually
be indexed under A, but the user search would be
searching for “Is.” [laughs] It’s very complicated,
and it causes problems. There are ways around it, if you have a system
that does that kind of thing. Helps the user
in a lot of cases, but, in some cases, actually
causes some difficulties. Innovative might be the only
system that does that, but understanding
how that works, I think, is very important in order
to make your materials findable. And when you get
into foreign languages, especially languages that
are foreign to your users, if you have a mostly
English-speaking audience and you’re cataloging materials,
say, in French, they’re not going
to necessarily know what is an initial article and what is not
in that foreign language and so making
your cataloging work, making your catalog work, however they search
for those items, is important. So, in this case, we have
this English-language title just kind of as a review of how MARC tagging works
for initial articles. In order to have this title file
under P in the title index, we would enter the second
indicator, 4, in the 245, that would tell the system
to start indexing after the first four spaces, so, on the fifth space
in that line of text. So it would drop off T-h-e
and the space following it and start indexing
at the word Profane. Similarly with “An Anatomy
of Addiction” as a title, in the MARC record,
we would have a 3 in that second indicator
space in the 245, so that the system
would start the indexing on the word Anatomy. It would drop off the A and
the n and the space following it and start indexing
on the word Anatomy. French title, “La Septième,”
in the MARC record, again, we have
a second-indicator 3 because we have a two-character
initial article, La, and the space following it. We want all of that
left off in the indexing, so the title will be indexed
under the word Septième. And this is the kind of thing
that it’s important to know for cataloging
and it’s important that the MARC record be
coded correctly, but, depending on how
your system works, you might want to add
additional fields that would help your
patrons find things, even if they include that
initial article in their search. And, when you’re
cataloging items in languages that are
not familiar to you, you might have
trouble figuring out exactly what the parts
of the item are, so figuring out exactly
what the title is, what the author is,
could be a little challenging. I think, with this example,
it’s fairly clear. In the English language,
Maria is a very common name, and so we can tell that that
probably is the author’s name, but it could be a title. It’s a little hard to tell. You’d have to do a little bit
of guesswork in your search. And “La trampa”
is probably the title, but it might not be
that obvious, what the title is,
what the author is, especially if you’re working
with an alphabet that is not familiar to you. In this case, like I said,
it’s pretty clear. This is the author,
this is the title, and this is the
publication information. It’s partly helped
by the placement of these things on the pages,
but it’s not always that clear, and so figuring out
what those various parts are can sometimes be a challenge and you might have to do
some experimenting and search for things
in various ways or just use keyword searching
when you’re searching for copy. This is just the MARC record
that represents that and shows that, yes,
Ana María Matute is the author, and “La trampa” is the title. I think I have another
slide just — Oh, no. That was the end of that. So the last of these challenges
that I wanted to talk about was identifying
the video region format. This is important,
even if you’re cataloging English-language DVDs
and Blu-rays; and videotapes,
if you still have those. Making sure that you represent
the format correctly in the MARC record
is very important. Making sure that you have
chosen the correct MARC record from WorldCat or wherever else
you’re getting your catalog copy is very important,
making sure that format matches. Because even
English-language materials might have a format that is not
the same as the U.S. format. This is a French DVD
and the code is right here, this little globe-type symbol. This is the universal symbol for
these video region format codes. This is format 2, region 2, which is the European format,
also known as PAL. It’s listed here as the version
as PAL, but, generally, region 2 is version PAL;
and region 1 is version NTSC, so you want to look
for that NTSC. That’s kind of the default
for American cataloging. And, Eva, I am not sure
what PAL stands for. [laughing] I should have looked that up. It’s the European video format. What you really need to look
for, nowadays, is that region code,
the little global symbol. But it is frequently accompanied
by that abbreviation, PAL, or that.
I think it’s an acronym for the format,
and NTSC is an acronym, too, and, similarly, I do not know
what it stands for. [laughing] But it’s what you need
to look for to make sure
that you have a U.S. format. So this is a French DVD. This would be important
to represent in the cataloging, ideally, in both the 538 note,
as here, and also in the 346 and 347, to identify exactly
what it is you have in hand. So this record is very complete and includes the format
in both locations. I have another example here. This one was a little misleading because it has these
suitability ratings, these age ratings included
that kind of look like format codes,
but they’re not. The format code is actually
further down, this little, tiny 2. You could just barely see it has that little globe symbol
surrounding it. It’s very hard to see
on this particular slide, but this is actually
a format-2 DVD as well. This is the catalog copy that
matches it and, in this case, that region 2
is only represented in the 538. It’s not represented
in the 3XX fields, so it’s not completely. Oh, thank you
very much, Geraldine. Phrase Alternating Line.
Interesting. Okay. Good to know. [laughs] Thanks very much. So, yeah, the region code,
you need to make sure. If you’re using this copy, you need to make sure
that it matches. Ideally, you would upgrade
the record in OCLC to have the region coding
in both places, but you do need to make sure that it matches
what you’re cataloging. And this is — Blu-ray discs
have region coding, too, but the region coding
for Blu-ray is actually represented
by letters, instead of numbers, and so this is
a European Blu-ray disc represented by this B, again,
with the little globe symbol, but with a letter,
instead of a number. And, again, represented,
in this case, not in the 538, but in the 347, 346, and 3– Well, actually here,
just in the 347 fields. So you’ll see
all different things [laughing]
in the copy that you find, but the important thing is that the copy you find
matches the format that is represented
by the item you’re cataloging. I just thought I’d go
through a few things to look for for cataloging, for finding copy
for various formats. When cataloging books, ISBN, of course,
is the thing you really — And, Geraldine,
that’s a good question, too. Or is that a statement? NTSC and PAL.
There are more formats. I don’t know if they go
beyond NTSC and PAL. Please let me know if you know.
[laughing] NTSC and PAL are the ones
I see most often, but I do see other numbers,
besides the 1 and the 2 and the A and the B. Somebody is typing. Because that’s
an excellent question. Zero for all-region. Oh, that’s good to know,
Natalie, thanks. Yeah. So, yeah, you will see at least
a variety of numbers and letters for those formats,
but I think the NTSC and PAL actually goes back
to videotapes. Videotapes had those
two formats, as I understand, but maybe the SECAM, too. At our library, we pretty much
only saw NTSC and PAL and, now, we’ve started to see these other numbers
on the discs. Very good things to look into. In any case, okay,
when you’re cataloging books, if you have an ISBN, that is the easiest way
to find copies: search by ISBN. That’s kind of your default. If you have an ISBN, that’s how
you want to start your search, but you can also use
pagination to match. You can’t usually
search by pagination, but you can match copies. So if you are able
to find a record, it looks like it
probably is a match, matching that pagination is
a quick way to see, “Okay, yeah. This looks like it is a match
to what I have in hand.” Title, especially using
those romanization tables to see if the way that the title should
be romanized, according to L.C., matches the way it’s been
romanized on the copy, the cataloged copy
that you have. Same with the author
and the publisher’s names. Dates can be a little tricky, especially with German
publications, I’ve found. A date preceded
by the word auflage is usually a printing date and not an edition date
or not a date of publication. And an ausgabe typically is
a publication date, but an auflage,
[laughing] very close terms, and then just one letter off
in the abbreviation, or a couple letters off is typically
a date of publication. And so dates have to be taken
a little bit carefully, when you’re using them
to match copy. And then the size, too. Measuring your size is a key to making sure that you have
a match with a book. This is just an example. It’s not the best example. This book actually has
a parallel title in English. It’s a book in Turkish,
as well as English, and so you have
that parallel title. But I thought it was
a good example of — I only could guess
that this is Turkish because the word Turkmenistan
is in the title. But this actually has CIP data, which, there’s a whole lot
of information on this item. Finding copy for this
would be very easy. But I thought it was
a good example of showing the importance of parallel titles
when they’re present, including the parallel titles
in your cataloging is very important for fully
representing the item and for helping
your users find it. And here’s the bibliographic
record for that. And you can see the parallel
title is included in that 245 and then also in the 246, there
is reference to the subtitles, to the parallel subtitles,
so that pretty much any way a user searches
for this item, they’re going to be
able to find it. This is just more
of that same record. Shows that this actually is
in Turkmen. I said Turkish. It’s actually in Turkmen
and in English. Some more details. And this
actually has a 520 in English, a summary note in English,
which can be very helpful for a primarily
English-speaking population. And just the rest
of that record. Lots of information
on this particular record. When you’re cataloging DVDs,
you might have ISBNs. ISBNs can be very,
very helpful, again, when you’re cataloging DVDs,
but most DVDs don’t have ISBNs. They do, though, usually,
have a UPC code, and, in OCLC,
the UPC can be searched with a standard number search. sn=in the command line
in Connexion. Very, very helpful. Publisher and distributor
numbers, too, can be searched. I usually search for those using
an MN in the command line. I’m going to show you
some examples of that. The title can be helpful, especially if you’re able
to transliterate it, any names that you’re able
to find and transliterate, if necessary; any dates,
again, taken kind of carefully because they might not be
exactly the dates you need to match to a cataloging copy; and the publisher
and distributor name. So Natalie had a question: “When cataloging
a foreign-language DVD, if the title is in English,
do we choose a record that reflects
that title in the 245 or do we use the record
with the foreign-language title as the 245?” So I believe, still, in RDA,
the preferred source of information for a DVD
is actually the title frame. So the ideal choice for that 245 would be what appears first
when you play the DVD, the first thing you see on the title screen
on the recording itself. If you don’t have access to
that, using the English title, if the English title appears
on the item, is fine, but if the title appears also
in the foreign language, I would use the English title
as a parallel title, so include both of them
and then include a 246 with reference
to the other title. So if you had, like the book
example we just had, the Turkmen example. So you have, for instance,
if this was a DVD and it had both
this Turkish title and the English title
on the case, you would include all
of that into your 245 and then you would include
the second title. If it’s the English title,
you would include a 246, so that both titles would be
indexed in your title index. That’s how I would approach
giving access to that. But, really, the preferred
source of information, if you’re cataloging
according to RDA, you would choose that,
if available. You would use
that source, if available. Does that make sense?
Okay. [laughs] Thanks for the question.
Good question. This is something that we
actually have in our library, which really threw me
[laughing] when I got it. It’s actually in Russian,
but I was not sure of that. The costumes were
a little bit of a clue, but I wasn’t completely sure. This is a language
or an alphabet I have pretty much no knowledge of. Looked vaguely familiar,
from other cataloging I’ve done. But, what it does have
is a UPC code. And so this is something
that you can search on in OCLC and so I told you
I’d give you an example. Searching by the standard
number in OCLC is a quick and easy way to have
an initial search for copy when you don’t have an ISBN. So just sn=and all of the
digits from that UPC code. And, actually, there are
several records in OCLC for this particular item. My default, when I’m doing copy
cataloging, is to look first at the item that seems to match
and that has the most holdings, the idea being that
the more libraries that have chosen this record, the more likely it is that it’s
the thing that I have, too. So that’s where I always start
with copy cataloging: I look for the thing
that has the most holdings and see if that matches. And so, in this case,
this is, of course, what we have in my library,
and so we have the holdings set for this library,
but what you would do is you would use
those transliteration tables. If you wanted to make absolutely
sure this was a match, you would try
to transliterate that title that appeared on the cover. Let me go back to that. So you would take this title
and you would try to match up these characters on the Russian transliteration
table and figure out if they match what’s here
in the 245; in the second 245. This actually
has duplicate 245s, one for the title
as it appears on the item and one for the
transliterated title and the transliterated names,
so that users can search by that transliterated title
and those transliterated names. And then there’s also
a translated title here, from the subtitles,
a title from the subtitles. So there’s your English title. In this case, Natalie, didn’t
come from the item itself, didn’t even come
from the title screen, but came from the subtitles, and so that can be included
as a variant title in your 246. It can be very, very helpful
for those of us who don’t speak or read Russian.
[laughs] So just with the rest
of that record, the details, this is again, a very,
very complete record that includes both the Cyrillic
and the Roman versions of all the information. Then, there’s a summary
note in English because this is an English-
language cataloging record. Which is represented,
I should point out, in the — Where is it? In the 040, there
is a delimiter b that says eng, and that represents
English-language cataloging. We’re going to come back
to that in just a minute. And also, too, so here,
even though this is a Russian-language DVD,
it’s actually in NTSC format. It’s actually
in an American format and so this little symbol
right down here, this NTSC, I don’t —
Let’s see. There is a region code
here, somewhere, and I can’t quite read it. I think it’s over here
by the sound information, but, seeing that NTSC
is enough to match on copy. When you’re cataloging CDs,
again, an ISBN might be present and can be helpful, UPC as well. With CDs, too, though,
the CD number, the publisher
or distributor number, is typically
almost always present, usually even on the spine
of the CD case. That’s where I usually
start my search for CDs and using a music number search,
an mn search in WorldCat. That’s frequently the most
reliable and quickest way to find copy for CDs. You can also use
the title of the album, if you’re able to read it
or transliterate it. I was looking at some CDs
in Amazon when I was looking
for examples here, and the titles of the albums
were in Korean. Couldn’t read them at all,
but then the titles of the songs that were included
were actually in English. The back of the CD case
included titles in English. I wasn’t able to find matches
for any of those and so I didn’t include them
[laughing] as examples here, but it’s the kind of thing that
might be helpful for searching, if you can search
on the contents of an item, you might be able to find copy
for CDs that way. And then, names, too,
if you’re able to see them or transliterate them. Dates, again, can be helpful, but can’t be relied on
exclusively. And then, the publisher
and distributor name, too. This is one that was
actually frustrating. I could not find a match
in OCLC for this. I don’t believe this has
been cataloged in OCLC. But I thought I would
show you, anyway, how I went about determining
that. [laughing] So this is an example
I found on Amazon. It does have a UPC and so I
started my search out that way, with an sn=and the UPC number. I didn’t find any
matches that way and so then I went to the
broader search in WorldCat. What I was talking
about a minute ago, in language of cataloging,
the delimiter beng in the 040, representing
English-language cataloging, when you have this little box
checked in World, in Connexion, you’re searching
only for things that have that delimiter b
in the 040. If you want to search
for copy from everywhere, that’s not just
English-language cataloging, if you uncheck this box,
you’ll find more information. So I did that for this
particular CD, just to see if I could
find anything else, and so I did that same
standard number search. Still found nothing, even with the language
of cataloging not limited to English. So I went back and I got
some more information. I decided to try the band’s
name, which is g.o.d, and the title,
which seems to be “Chapter 1,”
format: sound recordings, still had that language
of cataloging limiter unchecked, and found some things, but they
were not the same thing. [ Laughing ] They did not actually match
the item I was cataloging, so, had to give up on that one. This one, though, this is
in Greek, a Greek pop album. Definitely Greek to me
and Greek to everyone. This is Greek alphabet,
so it’s not something I know, but there is a publisher number. In this case, the publisher
number actually matches the UPC, but it can still be searched
with an mn search in WorldCat, and so I did that,
searched for mn using that number,
found copy that matches. And this is where that
Greek transliteration table would be helpful,
if you were able to transliterate
even just the first few words, first couple of words,
even, of that title, make sure that
it matched to this, you would have a double-check
against that number. So you have the number
that matches, maybe you’re able
to match the date, but then going ahead and doing
some of that transliteration, to make sure that the title
that you have on the disc in your hand actually matches
what’s been cataloged here. When you’re cataloging
scores, ISBN again. The ISMN, which is
very similar to the ISBN, can be used
as a standard number search. Publisher
and distributor number. And the plate number, which
appears, in a lot of scores, at the bottom of the first page,
or even every page of music. Plate numbers
are used less and less, now that music is not printed
from metal plates. It’s sometimes included,
still, though, referencing old plate numbers. Title and composer
and publisher can be used if you can decipher them,
much the way you would use the similar
matches in other formats. And dates, again, kind of
taken carefully [laughing] because the date
that you see on the item might not really be
the date of publication. This is an example that I used in my “Copy Cataloging Scores”
webinar, if you attended that. I thought it was a very
[laughing] informative example, this Czech score. I did not know this was Czech
when I first looked at it. There are a few clues
that it was published in Prague, that it’s Janácek,
but you wouldn’t necessarily, if you don’t know Czech,
know this was in Czech. So that was the first
challenge here. And this has a score and parts. So you know that,
and it also has a plate number. So this is an example
of a plate number, this H3712. This is where I would
start my search for this particular score. In OCLC, in Connexion,
I would type in mn: and that whole number,
including the H, the H3712. And there are actually
a lot of matches in OCLC to that plate number. Some of them obviously
are not matches. These are different composers, but all of these Janácek
matches are possibilities. Again, I would go with the — I would start my exploration
of these marked records with the most holdings. There are 18 holdings
on this particular record, and so I would look at that and
start matching the pagination. There’s the plate number
that matches, but I would match the pagination
and the number of parts and the pagination of the parts and just kind of make sure
that everything seems to match. Transliteration is not
necessary in Czech. It’s a Roman alphabet and so you would just
match word-for-word. Do the titles given here match what’s on the item
I have in hand? There’s the rest of that record,
in case you’re interested. And you see here, too,
there’s actually a parallel title on this score. This “Vater unser”
is a different language and so that’s given a variant
title entry in the 246. And this is my last thought,
so, if you have questions, please start thinking of them and we can try to address
more questions. But the way to make records
for items in languages other than your own
work for everybody. There are a few ways,
and I’ve talked about some of these
throughout the webinar, but I thought I’d go
through some of them again, specifically for this purpose. Adding variant titles,
adding a 246 that translates
the title proper. You can add as many 246 fields
as you need to a marked record and so, if you are
cataloging something, for instance, in Japanese,
and you’ve transliterated it or you have a transliterated
title in the 245 and you maybe also have
an English translated title in the 246, but you have a large patron base
that is Spanish-speaking, you might want to include
an additional 246 with that title translated
in Spanish. That is perfectly appropriate and very helpful to your users,
if they might search. That Japanese title I had
was called “Death Note.” There was an English title;
there was a Japanese title. If you think it’s possible that
your Spanish speaking users might be looking
for that title in Spanish, you might want to include a 246
in Spanish for those users. You might want to include
searchable initial articles. Now, this doesn’t account
for the problem with the Innovative systems,
where your user searches have the initial articles
dropped off, but, in most systems,
if searching for a title with the initial
article included would keep your user from
actually finding that title, adding a second 246,
adding a variant title with that initial
article included might be very helpful to them, so if they look for
“La Plaisance” as the title, instead of just Plaisance,
they’ll still find it. Including summaries
in all the languages that your patrons might need
can be very, very helpful. The 520 field, the summary note, is a repeatable field
in the MARC record and so I would recommend that,
if you have a patron base that is very diverse
in its native languages, having several 520s
might be a very useful thing, whatever you’re cataloging, whether you’re cataloging
in English or another language. Having instructions
in your catalog for searching the catalog
for material in multiple languages
can be very helpful. In our catalog,
on the title-search page, because we have this
Innovative catalog that does this thing of dropping
off all those initial articles, we have instructions
for our users on how to search for any title that starts
with an initial article. We have a list
of what initial articles will be automatically
dropped off and we have some clues
on how to search for titles that have words that might be
considered initial articles that are actually part
of the title. So I believe we actually include that “A Is for Apple” example,
or something like it, so that our users
are able to find them. That depends on the user landing
on that title search page and reading the instructions,
but at least it’s there. We think we’ve done
something to help users find titles in other languages. And then, finally, using
content-enrichment products, like Synthetic Solutions
or Content Café, that add pictures
to your catalog records, that add a picture
of the cover or of the case, something visual
representing the item can be extremely helpful in helping your users
find material that is in a language
other than their own. Those are mostly
subscription products. You can find other resources and I think most libraries
actually do use some kind of visual aid, now,
with catalog records, but I think keeping in mind
that those can be helpful for helping people find things
when they don’t know the language that they’re
looking at can be very useful. So that is all I had,
in terms of slides. Does anybody have
any questions or comments that they want to bring up,
that we haven’t dealt with? Anything that I talked about
that just didn’t seem clear or that you disagree with, even? I’d love to hear about it. I like for these to be
conversational, when at all possible. Taylor’s just added that there
will be a PDF version of this presentation sent out and please do send me an email,
if you have questions, if you have thoughts
on the presentation. Anything you want
to tell me or ask me, please feel free
to contact me at any time. Oh, we do have a question. “When cataloging
a foreign language, should we still select English
for the cataloging language?” Yes. If you are creating an English-language
cataloging record, if you’re creating
summaries in English, if your descriptive terms
are in English, then, yes, the delimiter b and
the 040 should be in English. The exception for that is if you’re using
another language to catalog. So, if you’re using a term
in a different language for the word “pages,”
for instance, in the 300 field, then you would use that language
as your delimiter b in the 040, but, generally speaking,
cataloging in the United States is English-language cataloging and there’s a delimiter b
in the 040. But that does not preclude you
from including other languages in fields where it’s needed. That just indicates
that the cataloging that you’re doing
is being done in English, that you’re working from an
English framework, essentially. Looks like we might have
a couple more questions. We have a couple more minutes
here, so I’ll let people type. Well, thank you all very much. Okay, again, please contact me. I love hearing —
Oh, there’s one more question. “Is there a field
for the rating for the DVD?” There is. I do not remember
offhand what it is, but, yes, there is
a specified MARC field. Somebody will probably reply
with the answer here. [laughing] I always recommend OCLC Bibliographic Formats
and Standards for looking those
specific numbers up. Thank you very much, Cathy.
The 521. Yeah. And there’s a specific format
that’s recommended for representing
that information. We don’t include it
at our academic library. We typically will leave
the information in the record, but we don’t typically add it,
but for a public library I think it is
important information. Thanks very much, Cathy. Well, thank you all very,
very much. I really appreciate
your attendance and your comments
and your questions. I look forward to talking
with you again. Post: All right.
Thank you, Maurine, for an informative webinar
this morning. Attendees,
if you enjoy this webinar, we are working with Maurine
to bring more topics in and, in the meantime,
we ask that you join us on June 6th
for Paul Signorelli’s webinar “Beyond Twitter and Facebook:
Fostering Community in Collaboration
with Social Media.” As always, we encourage
you to keep an eye on the SWFLN C.E. calendar, the SWFLN Facebook page,
or your message from the LISTSERV.
Thank you, everyone.

One thought on “05/30/2018: Copy Cataloging of Foreign Language Materials

  • this was very helpful. I would like to specialize in cataloging. How fluent would you say one should be to catalog a language that is not your own if you are applying for a position that wants you to catalog in a specific lanugage?

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