5 Disappearances That Were Solved Decades Later | Part 2

5 Disappearances That Were Solved Decades Later | Part 2


Denise Bolser In 1985, 24 year old, Denise Bolser lived
with her husband in Manchester, New Hampshire. On January 17, 1985, Denise vanished from
her home without a trace. The only clue that was found was a note that
was left behind which read “We’ve got your wife.” A few days later, her abandoned truck was
found at Logan International Airport. Inside the truck the authorities found her
personal belongings, including her Social Security card, birth certificate and local
charge cards, which were carefully laid out on her on the front seat of the truck. However, she was nowhere to be seen. The note that was found also did not provide
any clues as there was no ransom demands or any contact from the kidnappers. There were no suspects in the case and Denise’s
husband was never pursued as a person of interest and he divorced her in absentia. At first police believed that Denise was probably
kidnapped and possibly even murdered, but there was never an evidence to support this
other than the note. It wasn’t until a coworker of the firm she
worked for was accused of embezzlement that police began to think that she perhaps ran
away in fear. It was found that Denise herself may have
been responsible for stealing $12,000 by falsifying books in her role as a bookkeeper. She was charged with her crimes in absentia
in 1986. No new clues or tips would be found and she
remained missing. The case soon grew cold. Time after time police sent dental records
out to investigators in other parts of the country, wondering if this time they would
match the remains of some unidentified female corpse but with no luck. Then in 2002, Police would get a credible
lead. Denise was soon tracked down and discovered
to be living in Panama City. She had started a whole new family who had
had no idea about her past life. When questioned, Denise explained that she
had embezzled around $100,000 and she had to run when her ex-boss had threatened her
life. She also said that she had lived in South
Carolina, the Bahamas, California, and Hawaii during her absence. Denise had no idea that she was wanted for
embezzlement and that this is what brought authorities to her house. Authorities dropped the embezzlement case
in 1993, and Denise’s ex-boss is long dead. Kamiyah Mobley On July 10, 1998, at 7:00 am, Shanara Mobley,
delivered a newborn baby named Kamiyah Mobley at University Medical Center in Jacksonville,
Florida. But eight hours later, Kamiyah was abducted
by an African-American woman who was impersonating a nurse. She reportedly was dressed in hospital attire
who entered the room, assisted and conversed with the mother, and later walked out of the
room with Kamiyah in her arms. Employees initially believed that the woman
who kidnapped Kamiyah was a member of the Mobley family. After questioning the staff, police found
out that the suspect waited in the hospital for 14 hours, repeatedly asking nurses when
the baby would be leaving the nursery. She was in Shanara’s hospital room periodically
from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on July 10th after Kamiyah’s birth. The abductor told Shanara that there was a
problem with Kamiyah’s temperature at approximately 3:00 p.m. and said that she would return with
the infant in approximately 20 minutes. She then walked out of University Medical
Center with Kamiyah afterwards. Neither she nor the child were seen again. The police believed the abductor was between
25 and 35 years old and possibly wore a pair of glasses and a wig. She was dressed in a floral blue smock and
green scrub pants. She was carrying a large-sized black vinyl
or leather bag. Authorities also believed that the abductor
had knowledge of the centre’s building layout and was also familiar with medical terminology. Kamiyah’s father, Craig Aiken, was in jail
at the time of Kamiyah’s disappearance. He was charged with lewd assault because when
Kamiyah was conceived Shanara was only 15 years old and unable to legally consent to
sexual intercourse. Aiken was nineteen when his daughter was abducted;
Shanara had just turned sixteen. Shanara was awarded $1.5 million after settling
a lawsuit against the former University Medical Center. She has since had three other children. Despite extensive searches, there were no
leads or any suspects and the case went cold. Then in 2017, A girl named Alexis Manigo had
an inclination that she may have been kidnapped when she applied for a restaurant job and
couldn’t find her social security number. When Alexis demanded her social security number
from her mother, Gloria Williams, she broke down and confessed that she abducted her when
she was just a few hours old from a Florida maternity ward and raised her as her own. Alexis quietly pieced together the majority
of her backstory by herself from Google and realized that her name was Kamiyah Mobley
and her biological mother was Shanara Mobley. She once called her biological mother but
hung up when she heard Shanara’s voice. According to court documents, investigators
finally cracked the case based on two tip-offs: a friend who said Gloria confessed to them
and an individual who claimed to have heard it from Alexis. A DNA sample from the teen was taken and submitted
to a crime lab, where it was matched with the original newborn DNA taken the day Kamiyah
was born. The test confirmed the teen was, in fact,
Kamiyah. Gloria Williams was arrested in January 2017
on charges of kidnapping and interference with custody. She had a prior history with law enforcement,
having previously been charged with check and welfare fraud. It was found that Williams had suffered a
miscarriage about a week before she drove the three hours from South Carolina to Florida
and abducted baby Kamiyah. It is believed she then passed off Kamiyah
as her own daughter to family and friends, who said they never suspected a thing. In February 2018, Gloria pleaded guilty to
kidnapping and was sentenced to 18 years in prison. Kamiyah was then introduced to her biological
parents for the first time. However, Kamiyah continues to live in Gloria’s
house and says she looks forward to the day she is released from prison as she still refers
to her as her mother. Arthur Jones Arthur Jones was a husband and father of three
who lived in Highland Park, Illinois. He was a commodities trader with a seat on
the Chicago Board of Trade. On May 11, 1979, he told his wife that he
had a sudden meeting to attend to, after which he rushed out of the door. He would never come back to his wife and three
kids. Detectives would later find his abandoned
Buick near O’hare international Airport with all his belongings inside but found no
sign of him. Arthur’s wife told police that he had been
acting strangely in the days before his disappearance and on the day he disappeared, he wasn’t
dressed for business when he left the house. Police would later find that about six months
before his disappearance, Jones lost his job at the board of trade as a commodities trade
and had to sell his seat to pay for gambling debts in excess of $200,000. His wife told Highland Park investigators
that, at one point, he lost $30,000 betting on a basketball game. Another time, Jones took out a second mortgage
on their home – forging his wife’s signature in the process – to help fund his gambling. Moreover, his fellow commodities trader Carl
Gaimari was recently murder by two men wearing masks. This had impacted Arthur deeply, his wife
said. She also said that later in 1979 they scheduled
a holiday in California, in fact, and they even bought plane tickets. However, Jones subsequently requested that
they put off their trip for a week. His wife suspected that he was waiting for
a payout of some kind. All of this information lead police to believe
that Arthur had certainly met with foul play. But since there was no evidence to support
this, the case went cold. Arthur Jones was eventually declared legally
dead in 1986. His wife and children collected about $47,000
in Social Security benefits as a result. For decades his case would remain unsolved
until in 2011, the truth about Jones disappearance would come out. Arthur was tracked down in Las Vegas after
the Social Security Administration — acting on complaints from a man who said his Social
Security number was being used by another — approached the Nevada Department of Motor
Vehicles for help in locating him. Jones had been using a Social Security number
that belonged to Clifton Goodenough, a former Waukegan resident. An investigation found that Arthur Jones was
living under the name “Joseph Richard Sandelli,” and had made stops in Florida and California,
before settling in Las Vegas where he had been working as a sports bookie for 10 years. Arthur was arrested on four felony counts
related to identity theft and fraud. Arthur told investigators that he paid a friend
in Chicago $800 for fake documents and a Social Security number belonging to another man and
left his wife and children to get a fresh start. Over the past three decades, Jones was arrested
numerous times using different names in Florida, California and Nevada, according to investigators
who used his fingerprints to track his criminal history. Arthur was charged with fraud, burglary, obtaining
and using personal identifying information of another person, and possession of personal
identifying information to establish false status or identity. Tamara Milograd Tamara Milograd was a 15-year old Australian
girl from Melbourne. Tamara was the only girl amongst three children,
with brothers named Eugene and Nick. On September 18, 1971, Tamara told her mother,
Luba, that she was heading out to the Royal Melbourne show with a friend from school. The Royal Melbourne Show has been going on
since 1848, and there are thousands of people that show up to see the incredible sites and
more importantly, the rides and different forms of entertainment that are usually on
display for onlookers to enjoy. After reaching the show, Tamara and her friend
got separated as Tamara said she needed some change for the 5 Australian dollars she had
in her pocket. This was the last time Tamara was seen again. As time passed, her friend couldn’t find
her anywhere. She immediately notified her family who reported
her missing to the police. Despite extensive searches and police efforts,
Tamara would not be found. Weeks, months and years went by, but police
couldn’t find any evidence or leads to Tamara’s whereabouts. Although the family refused to give up their
search for Tamara, the police would find out that at the time of her disappearance, Tamara,
according to her relatives, had become a rebellious teenager and was actively pulling away from
her family. She even had an argument with her family about
her boyfriend and it was so bad that Tamara told to some of her friends that she wanted
to start a new life. This led authorities to believe that Tamara
had left at her own accord. But her parents and brothers, refused to stop
searching for her. There few unconfirmed sightings in the months
following her disappearance, that gave Milograd family some hope. One was at the Tarmac Hotel in Laverton. Another was that she had even slept at the
Royal Melbourne Show for two nights before leaving for St. Kilda and getting a job. Her mother Luba went to the areas where she
was believed to be seen but came up empty handed. According to Tamara’s brother, Nick, they
did whatever they could to be able to find her. He shared that they took trips across the
interstate searching for her, forcing them to go on “wild goose chases,” and even
hiring a private investigator. But unfortunately, they didn’t get any closer
to the truth. Over the years, the Milograd family prayed
that Tamara would come back to them. Years would pass and the case would grow cold. 17 years after Tamara went missing, her father
died, never knowing what had happened to his daughter. But on his deathbed, he had begged his family
to never give up trying to find his only daughter. He also told his wife, Luba, to never stop
searching. In 2010, the AFP’s National Missing person
Cordination Centre worked with Milograd family to feature her case in National missing persons
week. Then, 44 years later, in 2015, 39 year old
Corina Rusell was searching on the internet when she came across the AFP’S missing person’s
website. Corina had been searching for information
about her mother, Pauline Tammy Russell, who had died in a car crash in June 1976. Corinna’s Father was also in the car crash
but he survived. As Corinna got older she began to ask more
and more questions about her mother and finding only few answers. Her digging would later reveal that her father
and mother never married, as Pauline was unable to obtain a birth certificate. It wouldn’t be until 2015, when Corinna,
by chance, clicked on the AFP missing person website that she found a woman’s profile
who bore a striking resemblance to her mother. The profile she found was that of Tamara Milograd. Not only Tamara looked like her mother but
also shared the same birthday and had a father named Alexander. Corrina decided to get in touch with the National
Missing Persons Coordination Centre to try and see if the woman in the photo could be
her very own mother. Following a DNA Analysis, it was confirmed
that Pauline and Tamara were the same person. An incredible 44 years after Tamara had mysteriously
disappeared, 90 year old Luba would finally find out what had happened to her daughter. Not only did Tamara truly walk away from her
entire family, she had moved to another area in Victoria, changed her age from 15 to 18,
changed her name to Pauline Tammy Russell and had two kids before tragically dying in
a car crash. Luba, Eugene and Nick would finally meet Tamara’s
daughter, along with their great grandchildren as well. Marcia Honsch and Elizabeth Honsch On Sept. 28, 1995, New Britain police officers
on patrol just after midnight, spotted a sleeping bag behind the CT Beverage Mart in a shopping
plaza on Hartford Road, just down the street from Corbins Corner and the Westfarms mall. When they opened the sleeping bag they found
a young woman’s body wrapped in the blanket and a plastic garbage bag. She had been killed with a single gunshot
wound to the back of the head. Just one week later the body of another woman
was found 40 miles away in Tolland State Forest in Massachusetts. She had also died from gunshot wound. As days went by, police waited to receive
a missing-person report, something that would help them identify the women. Both victims had no identification on them
and all efforts to identify them failed. Investigators were able to lift a palm print
from the plastic garbage bag that held one of the women, but unlike fingerprints, there
was no database for palm prints, so the function of the print would only serve to match to
an existing suspect. Detectives shared descriptions, photographs
of the clothing that they were found to be wearing and sketches of their faces with the
public in hopes to identify their identities. They reviewed missing persons cases from across
North America. But they had no luck and the case soon grew
cold. In January 2011, with the help of forensic
testing investigators were able to prove that the two bodies were mother and daughter. This lent the idea that the murders were not
only linked, but likely carried out by the same killer, who was still at large. Even though police were able to determine
they were mother and daughter, they still did not know their identities. In 2014, police officers in New York received
a phone call from someone claiming that her relatives, Marcia and teenager Elizabeth Honsch,
had gone missing 19 years earlier. The family had been looking for them without
getting authorities involved. The caller told police that Marcia’s husband,
Robert Honsch had told them he, Marcia and Elizabeth were moving to Australia to start
a new life. The call prompted Massachusetts, New Britain
and New York investigators, over a series of days, to interview several relatives. Detectives took DNA samples from one relative
to confirm a family connection to the two unidentified bodies. It was found that Honsch never moved to Australia. He wound up in Ohio, where he met his future
bride, Sheryl Tyree, at a Christian truck stop. The two truckers married and settled in Dalton,
Ohio. They went on to have three children. Sheryl did not want to take the last name
Honsch, so Robert changed his surname to Tyree. The name change made it difficult for Marcia’s
worried relatives to locate Robert Honsch through Internet searches over the years. It was through Robert’s brother and sister-in-law
that the relatives searching for Marcia and Elizabeth connected with Sheryl. They communicated with Sheryl for several
years. In one conversation, Sheryl conveyed that
Robert told her he had no other marriages, no children, was an only child and his parents
were dead. One relative spoke to Robert in November 2013
about Marcia and Elizabeth. He told the relative that Marcia had met another
man and took off, taking Elizabeth with her. When the relative probed deeper, Robert said
he had amnesia. In 2014, after the relative contacted the
police, detectives questioned Honsch and he said that something must have happened in
1995 to make him lose touch with all his family, but he could not remember the event. He said there were a lot of things he could
not remember since 1995. Investigators found that the Palm print found
at the crime scene matched Roberts. Authorities said examination of items found
near Elizabeth Honsch’s body connected him to the scene. More evidence pushed authorities to arrest
Robert Honsch for their murders in 2014. He was found guilty and sentenced to life
without parole.

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