Descriptive cataloging for books and DVDs: What is the title? 12-13-2017

Descriptive cataloging for books and DVDs:  What is the title?  12-13-2017


[Okay, Good morning everyone. My name is
Suzanne Walker. I’m the supervisor for the Indiana State Library’s Professional
Development Office. Tthank you guys so much for joining us for today’s webinar.
We are so pleased to have Andrea Morrison and Thomas Whittaker from the
Herman B Wells Library IU Bloomington here today to talk to us about
descriptive cataloging for books and DVDs, what is the title? I know sometimes
that is tricky. I’m gonna start the webinar off with a couple of
announcements. The State Library has many ways that we try to stay connected to
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am a little behind on archiving my webinars so it might take a little bit
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that our new trainings for 2018 – we are gonna announce those next week – I think
next week – so you’ll at least get a sense of some of the webinars that are coming
for 2018. So without further ado I’m going to turn things over to Andrea and
Thomas. Welcome Andrea and Thomas! Thank you
so much!] Welcome to Descriptive Cataloging for
Books and DVDs: What is the Title? My name is Andrea Morrison and I’m here
with my colleague Thomas Whittaker. I’m the head of media cataloging here at
Bloomington Wells Library and I’m the head of monographic text cataloging and
we’re both in technical services at Indiana University Libraries in
Bloomington. We wanted to give you what our voices sound like because we will be sharing – explaining – this live to you. Here are the topics we
are going to cover today: cataloging sources, variant titles, variant title
definitions, instructions and sources of information, we’ll have some basic
examples of variant titles, we also have a handout that we can share with a link
afterwards that gives you some of those definitions, we have some special
scenarios – those include things like franchise titles, special designs, we also
will cover alternative titles, parallel titles, collective titles, manifestation
lacking a collective title, and we’ll mention devised title. So here are some
cataloguing sources that you may or may not already be using. The basic
cataloguing instructions that a lot of us are using, unless we use specialized
instructions, is RDA: Resource Description and Access, which was
implemented in 2013. The Library of Congress, LC, program for
cooperative cataloging PCC policy statements on those instructions are
available free in the RDA toolkit, which is published by the American
Library Association and later we’ll show you some of those access instructions
because they are great for titles and variant titles. The actual policy
statement – LC-PCC PS – that has a lot of great examples, is two point three point
six point three. We’ll also cover a little bit about MARC fields two forty
six and seven forty but we did promise to show you some OPAC views as well as
MARC views, so don’t worry we’ll do that. So the policy statement covers both
showing you the MARC fields but also when you might want to add variant
titles for permutations related to the title proper and other titles borne by
the item, for example cover title. Then Thomas will cover best
cataloguing practices from OLAC and other communities and we’ll show you a
little bit from standards that will help you for inputting into OCLC,
OCLC bib formats and standards and I’ve linked field 246 and 740 there. These
links will be available through our slides which will be freely available to
you as well as our handout. The the handout is called Types of Titles.
Also we wanted to remind you that MARC 21 format for bibliographic data is
available. [So as Andrea mentioned, I’m gonna talk about some OLAC best
practices. OLAC is the online audio-visual catalogers. If you’re not
familiar with OLAC and you do any type of audio-visual or media cataloging I
would strongly suggest that you visit their site and also if you don’t mind
receiving emails once in a while log on and get connected to their listserv
especially if it’s a situation where you may only catalog media every once in a
while and you have questions, the community there at the listserv is very
responsive and helpful for folks, but the the best practices guide for cataloguing
DVD, video, and blu-ray discs using RDA
and MARC 21 is a picture of the title page there on the left, and also I want
to briefly mention that while we’re not going to be covering authorized access
points for works in this webinar, there is an LC PCC policy statement that
pertains to constructing authorized access points for motion pictures,
television programs, and radio programs that is immensely helpful and the link
for that instruction is there on the right. [So here are are a few variant
title definitions. In RDA the definition is: a title associated
with a resource that differs from the title recorded as a title proper. Also a
parallel title proper and other title information, a parallel other title
information, an earlier title proper, a later title proper, a key title, or an
abbreviated title. Have you ever found that it’s sometimes difficult to figure
out what is the title? What source should you use? Well chiefly we look for a title page or a cover title in books and monographs,
but sometimes it can be a source that has more information, if the title page
has a brief title and the colophon has another title. So how do we deal with
improved access? We add variant titles. Variant titles include those that
appear in the manifestation. They’re associated with the manifestation
through reference sources and these can be popular names, assigned by a
cataloging agency, their devised titles for collections, their corrected titles,
part of title, and other variations in the title proper or other title. And
hopefully our examples will help you be less confused. So where do you get the
sources of the information for a variant title? Well first of all as I said you
have to decide what your title page is. And then you record the variant title
from any source from within the resource itself that
you’re cataloging and from outside the source, and then using your own judgment
especially for permutations or variations of a title, to expand an ampersand or to give an alternate for a symbol for example. Now for sources of
information for the policy statements and DVDs, again this policy statement is
an excellent source of variant title examples and for books as well as motion
pictures etc. And a variant title should also always be considered important for
identification or access. Now what that means is, it should be important to
you. So add a variant if you feel it’s important. We have a few examples. And for DVDs, Thomas reminds us always to have a variant title from the container when it
differs from the title proper. Now I don’t always do that with a cover title,
if I feel it’s not important for identification and access. Here are the
actual instructions from RDA: record a variant title that is considered
important for identification or access by applying the basic instructions on
recording titles at RDA two point three point one and make a note on the source
or basis for a variant title if considered important for identification
or access. Now we’ll show you some pictures. So here’s an OPAC view and
here’s a MARC view for Form and Function. And this is a cover title but the title
page is exactly the same. You notice that we have to transcribe the
ampersand, right, so best practice is to always give a variant title then if we
are transcribing the title proper as form ampersand function, and then here’s
a good example also of when you might want to record a portion of title and
we’ll show you other examples later for that, but for Form and Function the
typical cataloging practice is to add a 246 field 30 for portion of title
form and the word and a n d function and not to give the other title, however I
have given this in an or because if in your catalog it works better to give the
other title, you may do so. That can be your local practice. The
instruction is, make a variant title for for a portion of a title proper when it
is judged that some users would consider the portion as the title
proper. Here’s a typical example of portion of title. Again the title page
looks very much like this cover. The cover had some nice pictures, so that’s
why you have it here. Civil War London. Well, that could cover a
pretty broad time period, right? But the other title is a Military History of
London Under Charles the First and Oliver Cromwell so an OPAC title and variant
title and in MARC the best practices 246 30. Now have I seen this missing from
records? Absolutely. It’s not required. It is not core to do this. It’s catalogers
judgment to add this variant, but I feel that Civil War London… is so…it’s vague and I feel that our users would be helped by transcribing
this portion of title. Transcribing an other title, so the remainder of the
title, what we transcribe after in field 245 subfield B,
that is probably the most typical portion of title that’s transcribed in
field 246 30, but it is not the only type of portion of title you can
transcribe. So here’s an example and this would be entirely up to you. So here is a
pocket guide to Indiana sportfish identification and notice sport fish is
very big in design right. Well I would not give Sportfish, as a portion
of title, but here’s some possible variants: No variant. You just don’t feel
it’s important, or give a variant for Indiana sportfish identification because
if someone is looking up Sportfish in your catalog they probably want
sportfish in Indiana, maybe not, and then since sportfish is the design that’s big
in this title, then maybe you want to give sportfish identification as a
portion of title, and the Indiana sport fish identification or just sportfish
identification would both be appropriate in a 240 six-30 field. You could add one
or both. It’s your judgment. You decide what’s useful for your users. Now this
one is a little bit more difficult. So here is a government publication from
the Weather Service, NOAA. It has an acronym in it: NOAA. And it is celebrating
200 years of science service and stewardship as part of the title. Now
this cataloging record, this example which I’ve actually linked the e-book, is
is a cover title so the title source of information is the cover. At the head
of the title, this is the title. And notice that they don’t transcribe
NOAA and then give celebrating 200 years of science service and stewardship in
another title, as a remainder or subtitle. That just doesn’t make sense. It
grammatically hands together. So I’ve shown you the example in the 245, and
please do notice that most of our examples, we are not giving you complete
245 and 246 fields because otherwise it would just be too many words on
these screens, so often we’ll leave off the period at the end too. We just aren’t
going to give you all that extra information. Now here’s an example of a
variant in MARC field 246 three blank. This is when
you are giving a permutation of the title. Somebody may
search under this title under what NOAA, the acronym, means: National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration and then alternately if you really thought
someone would search under celebrating 200 years you could give the words but
the cataloging agency didn’t feel that it was important to do so and I would
agree. I think it’s a little bit too much because they’re also giving a popular
title, and here’s an example of how to give a popular title. Now I didn’t show
you but actually if you click on the e-book you will see this NOAA 200th
anniversary book and a little emblem, its kind of on the cover or
elsewhere in the book and apparently the government agency that cataloged it
knew that it was also known as this, so this great, so if
your users know a book, like they come in and they call something, the red book or
the green book, you could say also known as and and give a note in 246 subfield i
also known as colon and then the title that that book is known by. Notice that
the indicators in 246 field, the variant title field is one blank. If you’re
going to use the subfield i you should use one blank. So again you can see how
these variant titles are a judgment call. And then I’ve given you an example for a
number that is displayed as a word in a title proper: Six plays for children by
Aurand Harris up on the right part of your screen, and typically you do not
need to give a variant if a number is shown as a word when
you transcribe that, not unless you felt like someone really would search under
the Arabic numeral six, so that’s not that likely. And here’s just a few for
you to think about how a portion of title reported as variant title is
really your judgment call. Also at the bottom is a Library of
Congress LC PCC policy statement example that shows you how you can give a
corrected title using that same variant title form 246 one blank subfield i
corrected title, and honestly if the corrected part of the title was about
word 75 because you had a long title or it was buried in the other title, you do
not need to even give this. You can just simply give a note and say, you
know, a note about a misspelled word in the title. So it’s only give this variant
title if it’s important for access, and since nev mechanism, that’s important
for access. It’s right in the first five words. Yes. Give the variant. So in these
three examples Adam newborn and perfect the Renaissance promise of eternity the
title proper, adam newborn imperfect, doesn’t really tell you what they’re
gonna talk about. They’re gonna talk about the Renaissance. So, yeah that’s a
perfect example of you’re probably gonna need a variant title. And you don’t want
to actually record Adam and then newborn and perfect in other title right, so a lot
of grammar really is very important, and if another cataloging
agency recorded a title and you would not have recorded it that way, the way to
deal with it is add variants, and that also will help prevent duplicate records,
which we would all love wouldn’t we. So how to read Nancy is fun, I grew up
reading Nancy, so the elements of comics in three easy panels. Well I knew what
Nancy was when I saw this picture but you know, younger people probably don’t
know who Nancy is so the elements of comics in three easy panels is a great
variant title. And then here’s one of our older government documents, and to even
verify that the United Arab Republic Egypt was the title proper, I had to look
elsewhere in the book and it verifies it on actually the back cover, but I would
never give this title as United Arabic Republic and then colon
other title Egypt, I would just supply a comma: United Arab Republic
comma Egypt or even no comma however I would give a variant for this. I would
give Egypt. Because this is kind of like a tourist manual and it would be
helpful for people. They wouldn’t look for a tourist manual under United Arab
Republic, they would look for Egypt. So these are just things for you to think
about. And one more for books; consider the grammar. If a title consists
solely of the name of an agent, record the name as the title, however this title
is Gene Stratton-Porter author and naturalist, and it’s very clear from this
design that author and naturalist is probably other title right? Again it’s a
judgment call. So if the title is Gene Stratton-Porter and that should be space
colon space author and naturalist then the variant can be, title appears on item as
Gene Stratton-Porter comma author and naturalist and so that will help you
find this both ways. It will prevent duplicate records, and if you were
cataloging this for the first time, you could just say well author and
naturalist that’s really in opposition to Gene Stratton-Porter;
these are noun phrases side-by-side like my colleague Thomas, so colleague and Thomas are two nouns that have equivalent meaning so if I’ve thought of Gene
Stratton-Porter author and naturalist as two noun phrases with that equivalent
meaning, then I could record them as the title proper with the comma and then
give the variant which I would do because otherwise we’ll have duplicate
records. We don’t want that. [Alright so now I get to talk about some
introductory words and phrases and you’ll notice I got two beautiful
pictures of title screens there. It’s important to note, when
cataloging resources that consist of moving images, you are supposed to use
the title screen or screens, title frame or frames as the chief source of
information. Now I will have examples later on in this presentation
where that is not the case and I do realize that in a lot of cataloging
agencies they don’t necessarily have the resources either technological or time
to actually view title screens and there are ways around this. As an alternative,
you are allowed to give a disc label title. They prefer the disc label title
to the container title because the disc label is affixed to the medium and can’t
ever go away, unless I guess complete damage to it, but the container is
usually an insert behind plastic that could be removed, it can get torn or
damaged, and get separated from the item. Now on to introductory words and
phrases: here on the left we have Walt Disney presents The Reluctant Dragon. Now we’re instructed in RDA two point three point one point six: do not transcribe
words that serve as an introduction and are not intended to be part of the title.
So in this example, Walt Disney presents is not intended to be part of the title.
It’s an introductory phrase. So we record the title as, The Reluctant Dragon and
you can give Walt Disney Presents as part of the statement of responsibility
in a subfield C, however you may want to give a variant title where Walt Disney
presents is the first part of the title, if you think that someone might be
looking for it in that way. Now on the right, we have a separate example where
the introductory words are actually connected to the title grammatically so
Ken Murray’s Bill and Coo and in this case Ken Murray is connected to the
title with the possessive, so we actually do include those words as part of the
title proper, but we will also give a variant title for a portion of title
just beginning with Bill and COO. Another case where we use and see variant
titles is with Arabic numbers so on our example on the left, 13 going on 30… the
LCP CCPs for recording variant titles for Arabic numbers excluding dates
instructs us that we are to make a variant title substituting the
corresponding spelled out form of the number in the language of the title
proper if it is thought that some users might reasonably expect that the form
was spelled out in words in the source. So imagine a user in this case that
knows that they want to find 13 going on 30. They’re looking in your OPAC to find
if the library owns this resource. They may not know that 13 and 30 on the
resource are in numbers as opposed to being spelled out in words so it’s
important for access that we give a variant spelling out 13 and 30 so that
the user may be able to find this resource either way they are likely to
search it. This is an example where we took the title from the disk label
and OLAC best practices say when we take the title from anywhere other than
the title screens to always indicate that we did so. Now the example on the
right is a little more interesting in my opinion, so we have 2 fast 2 furious with
the number 2 so we want to give the variant of the number 2 spelled as a
word t w o in the case that someone might look for it like that, and that’s the
spirit of the instruction, but in this case really to read this in English we
actually mean the t o o variant of the word 2 so I decided that it would be
appropriate to give another variant with it spelled t o o and then also since this
is the second movie in the Fast and Furious franchise it’s likely that users
may know this as Fast and the Furious 2, without knowing that it’s actual title
is too fast too furious. Continuing on with numbers, remember in
the last slide I stated that the corresponding spelled out form of the
number should be in the language of the title proper, so here’s a case where we
see the title screen is 12 but the resources in Russian so the proper way
to give a variant title for this would be to give the spelled out version of
the number 12 in Russian which I’ve done in the paired fields there in the
first and second 246. Now if your users are mostly english-speaking users and
maybe they don’t know the word for Russian which I certainly didn’t until I
looked it up to give this variant title, then I would also give a 246 and the
English spelling in case that you were looking for it this way. Now symbols.
There are various instructions on how to deal with signs and symbols. In RDA 1.7.5
we’re instructed that we should replace a symbol or other character that cannot
be reproduced with a description of the symbol and indicate that this
description was taken from outside the resource. Normally how we do this is in
square brackets. There’s also a rather large LC PCC policy statement on signs
and symbols and there’s also a policy statement on Greek or other non Latin
script letters and that’s policy statement for 1.4 and in that we’re
instructed to Romanize all occurrences of Greek and non Latin script letters
and we may also give the non Latin form, so that’s exactly what we did in the
case of the movie Pi. The title consists solely of the symbol Pi.
So the 245 we record as Pi spelled out, the Romanized form, in square brackets
indicating that we took it from outside the resource, and then we are optionally
allowed to add the symbol as a variant title which we did in the
246 and then a note indicating that the title consists solely of the
mathematical symbol for pi. [This is Andrea again and you probably have
titles in your library’s collection with a heart in the symbol of
a heart and just a note if you feel like your users might search under that
symbol as I love instead of I heart you could actually add two variants for that
with those spelled out words. So the symbol for heart would be displayed in
the title proper just like Thomas has displayed the symbol for pi. You know
some special scenarios – so this is a collective title. So a collective title
is a title that stands in for the entire resource. So this title contains two
works, actually a collection of Mary Webb’s poems plus a collection of her
nature essays which actually has its own title, The Spring of Joy. So this
is a little bit difficult and I showed you what the cataloging records show in
OCLC connection when you return the indexes because people were a little
confused about how to record this. So I gave you the proper way to record a
collective title of this sort when there is a specific title within the
collective title. If you chose not to record the title this way, in the 245 10
poems and then you use a semicolon because you’re going to have another
title with a and as a conjunctive subfield B and comma you capitalize the
spring of joy which you could see it’s not capitalized in the index of titles
to the left, and then you add an access point for the title that’s within the
title and that access point is in a 740 field and 740 fields are for
analytical entries, in other words they’re titles within the title and you want
to give access but you do not want to give authorized access points, so Spring
of Joy is an access point however notice it’s not a name title access point. One
way you can get around that is by adding a name title access point with the 700
field and if you do that you want to use one two especially that second
indicator two which means this is contained within the work. You may or
may not, it’s what you choose to do include the subfield i note which is a
relationship designator container of work colon and then you have the name,
Mary Webb and then her additional title that’s within this work. This is an old title that is available in HathiTrust and
this was never cataloged this way. This would be an appropriate way to catalog
this. If you didn’t want to catalog it this way, another way you could do it
is just add at least a 246 for spring of joy as portion of title. I mean this is
probably the best way, but not everyone can afford to do it or can look up
all these fields. So what’s more important, providing access to your users
or doing everything perfectly? Let’s provide access to our users.
So even if you recorded this title as just Poems and the Spring of Joy I
would say at least capitalize The Spring of Joy and at least add a 246 Spring
of Joy and that would be better than not having a variant title at all. That one
was kind of a tough one. Okay so another special scenario is
franchise titles. And what do I mean when I say franchise? So a franchise are often
related media that often use a common title and share a fictional universe and
they’re often transmedia; they span books, films, games, etc. Some of these might be
Lord of the Rings, or Hunger Games and so the OLAC best practices for
handling franchise titles, and this actually comes from their video game
cataloging manual but it’s transitioned over into other media, and will probably
be part of the updated DVD and blu-ray cataloging best practices guide when
that gets updated, is to record the franchise title and the number and/or
specific title as part of the title proper 245 subfield a adding a colon for
clarity. Do not put a space in front of the colon because it’s not ISBD
punctuation. Only record a title as other title information if it is clearly
secondary to the title information and is not necessary to distinguish the
title from other titles in the franchise. We’ve got two examples of this on the
next slide. So here we go, we’ve got Disney Pirates of the Caribbean and so
Disney there is an introductory word so we don’t include that as part of the
title. So Pirates of the Caribbean Dead Men Tell No Tales
so Pirates of the Caribbean is the franchise and dead men tell no tales is
integral to the title so we transcribe the title as Pirates of the Caribbean
colon space dead men tell no tales and make sure to give a 246 30 part of
title for dead men tell no tales and you could also indicate that you see Disney
at the head of title, you could also even give a variant title with Disney as
the first word if you thought people would be looking for that that way.
On the bottom I have x-men Days of Future past and I have three examples
here of how you might encounter this title. Only the first is considered best
practice. Days of Future past is not a subtitle, it’s integral to the title of
this film. Nor is it a part title. It is not a smaller part of a title called
X-men. X-men is the franchise title. Now we’re going to show you a few
alternative titles. An alternative title is defined as the second part of a title
proper that consists of two parts, each of which has a form of an independent
title joined by a word such as or or its equivalent in another language, and this
definition and other definitions will be on that handout, so in this case this
title all around the house or how to make homes happy is all part of the
title proper and that’s because RDA instructions say record an alternative
title as part of the title proper, so 245 subfield a all around the house – and I
need to point out that there is no subfield B because it’s all part of the
title proper – but however you do add the commas before and after that conjunction
or and you capitalize the alternative title, how to make homes
happy and it’s a best practice to add a variant 246 30 how to make homes
happy. Now if this had like a running title for example, you can use
your options for second indicator in MARC field 246 and a running title
would be second indicator 7 and you could give the appropriate running title,
so I’m just giving this as an example; this didn’t have a running title. Notice
this is a good example too of when an author has this author of motherly
tales etc and often in RDA we’re recording all that additional
information but we still don’t record this kind of advertisement. [So
here’s an example of an alternative title for a motion picture. We have
school for scoundrels or how to win without actually cheating. In this
example we do exactly the same thing that we do for books, so we record all of
this as part of the title proper and give a part title for the second half of
the title. This is a good example also of the
fact that sometimes a title for a motion picture can span multiple title screens
so we have school for scoundrels on one screen and then it’s connected by the
conjunction or on the second title or how to win without actually cheating. [Now
here’s some examples of parallel titles, and in RDA you can take a parallel title,
so a title in another language, and sometimes there’s more than just one
other parallel title, you can take it from any source within the resource
itself; it could be an added title page, it could be a book that’s inverted or
tête-bêche and you have the first part of the book is in English; you invert it and
it’s upside down, you read it in French for example. This is a Canadian example.
It’s a good example because if you search this in WorldCat or Connection
you will see that the Canadian cataloging agency actually missed the
fact that this was originally put in with cataloging and publication data
with just our story and notre histoire as part of the title. In actuality
according to their cataloging practices, they record the entire logo up there for
their Parks Canada 1911 to 2011 a hundred years our story. That is
their practice. They record that. That’s fine if they do. In RDA we’re
encouraged to accept what other cataloging agencies do, but we want to
make sure that the variants are there for how our users can can find this,
and so here’s the the variants; the 246 one one and the first indicator one
means just make a note that this is a parallel title, so you do not have to
have first indicator one, you could have first indicator three if you don’t want
a note, and the note would say parallel title. So Parks Canada here is is written
out in French, so that’s the parallel title and usually you
all of the parallel title and then the other variant which is 246 3 blank is
our story; you use the equal sign in MARC to say that the next parallel title is
coming and then that parallel title to our story is notre histoire. So
there’s a couple different ways you could do this and that’s why the records
in Connection were kind of confusing but as long as you have the variants then
you provide your users access. Here’s another example of a parallel title. So
this work has an added title page and an AACR2 cataloging, it was perfectly
fine. The OPAC would read Welsh folk tales by the author etc. It would only
give the English form with a note saying that there was an added
title page for the Welsh. Actually this book is in English and Welsh but to our
users the Welsh was not very useful right, so in RDA however we could record
everything, and I’ve given you the example of how you can record everything.
You do keep the statements of responsibilities for parallel titles
with the title proper if you choose to record them that way, so you can record
the two parallel titles and one statement of responsibility. That’s
another decision you could make, but this is recording it in full. It’s a good
practice. Again the parallel title variant would be 246 1 1 for the Welsh,
and you can also use 2 46 1 5, 5 meaning added title page and do that, but I would
not do them both. So that’s a decision for you. The 246 1 5 would be a
good one if you didn’t want to update the AACR2 cataloging right? [All right,
so parallel titles for DVDs, and man are there a lot. So in this example of Pan’s
Labyrinth, the actual title screen has the title in the original Spanish
language, I’m not going to pretend to know how to pronounce it because I would
just butcher it but we see there in that top screenshot that
we have a parallel title from the optional English subtitles, and that’s
something that’s really interesting with RDA that we couldn’t do with AACR2, is
that a parallel title can be taken from anywhere within the resource including
the optional subtitles. We see also on the disc label there that Pan’s
Labyrinth is written in English. This is the American release of the DVD, so they
chose the American or English title for their disc label. So there are many ways
that we can record this and all of them are appropriate, so in the first case we
can treat it as if Pan’s Labyrinth is not a parallel title, because it’s in the
optional English subtitles and just give the Spanish title in the 245 and then
if we thought it was needed for access which in this case I would say it
definitely is, give the title on the disc label in English subtitles as Pan’s
Labyrinth. We could also treat Pan’s Labyrinth as a parallel title as in the
second example there or if we don’t have the resources to be able to look and see
that the title screen is actually in Spanish, we might have to record the
English title in the 245 and note that title is from the disk label. Note that
this does limit access for those who may know the film by the Spanish title, and
the OLAC best practice recommendation is to make a note for the source of the
parallel title proper if it is taken from a different source than the title
proper. So this opens a can of worms. Most of our DVD titles have multiple
subtitle options. How many do we record as parallel titles? Do we record
any as parallel titles and where does it stop? So this is a case where we use
cataloger’s judgment to decide what is helpful for our users. If we have a large
Spanish-speaking population or French-speaking population or whatever,
we may want to add those parallel titles from the optional subtitles if we feel
that our users would be able to find it under that title, but note here that we
also give the 500 note indicating where the parallel titles came from, and this
is also an example of multiple parallel titles where we can just string them
along equal sign after equal sign in the subfield b. [Now we have more examples of collective
titles. A collective title is the title proper that is an inclusive title for a
resource that contains also separately titled
component parts. So here’s your example four one act plays, and then the separate
parts are the parts that are listed, they look like table of contents too, doesn’t it.
So actually the RDA instructions say to record collective titles and titles
of individual contents as appropriate to the type of description, so you do have
to be careful. Usually with books we’re cataloging with a comprehensive
description but if you’re doing an analytical description there are some
slight differences in cataloging, so just be aware of that. And an analytical
description would be like when you catalog a special issue of a journal or
of an archive, part of an archive. So here’s your comprehensive description:
you record the collective title. The title of the individual contents however
are recorded if they are considered important, and they may not be. Most of the time we record them and then we record related works which is a core element,
but only for Library of Congress for compilations. The way we record these
works that are the plays, The Rest Cure, Between the Soup is to give a 505
contents note – that’s one option or to give and then in addition give an
analytical authorized access point for the predominant or first work in the
compilation if substantial, so this is your decision. And then they give you
some guidance to in the policy statements that do not apply
to anthologies of poetry. You don’t want to have a table of contents for all the
poems. Of course you could make an exception if you had a long epic poem
that’s part of a compilation. And here’s how you would do this: 245 Four One
Act Plays 505 The Rest Cure – now you could do an enhanced 505 and then code these
titles with 505 zero zero and then the titles would be subfield t. You can also
add 740s and these would be access points but not authorized,
and they’re for the analytic titles; the titles within the title –
that’s why it’s 740 02 – second indicator 2 – that’s important. That
provides a browse title access and the 505 with the subfield t’s would usually
provide keyword title access for the individual play titles. If you really
want best access, then you can add the 700 12 – for this name, this author, and this
title which is contained within the work. Often this is not done unless you felt
like that title was really important. And then I give you an example of the
enhanced contents. That’s optional. What does LC prefer? Well to save themselves
some time, so they usually just give a 505. Sometimes they enhance it, and then
they also add at least one access point. I usually add access points for most of
the plays if they’re like 3 4 or 5 but not for 8 or 9. And here’s another
collective title. What’s interesting about this was this is the cover and it
has the individual plays, but the title page does not show the individual plays.
The title page just says four Irish rebel plays. Here is the actual cataloging in
OCLC. You’ll notice again Four – they don’t do a variant with the Arabic number 4,
you could if you wanted to – you could identify James Moran who’s the
editor also as a compiler if you wanted to,
but notice the 505. All these different plays are by a different
author, so if you wanted to then you could supply those in a 700 name title
access point for each one of those. Again that’s a lot of work so not everyone
would do it, But if you had a high school that was
reading one of those plays, boy you’d want that access on your record, and you
can go in and add it later. Here’s what they look like. So you see
below, seven hundred one two and first author of when the dawn has come etc. so
hopefully this is a good example of how you can, you know improve the access when it’s important, even if it’s important later. Maybe you never even knew this was
important until someone comes in and says we’re reading this for class. Notice that we usually don’t create an
authority record to support these individual contents, short stories, that
kind of thing even if they’re kind of novelettes. That’s not that typical. So here’s an example of a collective title for a DVD
and for DVDs it’s highly unlikely that you will find a collective title to
be on the title screens or even on disk labels so your container is typically
your best choice and we can do that because RDA two point two point two
point three says use as the preferred source of information the first
applicable source with a formally presented collective title. In our case
this is the cover here: wartime comedies, and we can give two
variants of the collective title. You can’t see it very well but way up
in the proof of purchase above the UPC we have another collective title that
may be helpful for folks – it’s definitely a good one – a movie wartime comedy
collection; and then also the container’s spine has a subtitle to the eight movie collection, so we also are going to give
a five oh five contents note for the individual titles
contained within this collection and you can see the disk labels there is where I
took the titles for the individual titles. [Those are some great movies, great
examples Thomas. So what do you do when the manifestation, the resource you
can access or is physically published locks a collective title? So maybe it’s
something from Shakespeare and it just says you know Hamlet and Macbeth – that’s it. There’s no collective title. So if the
type of description is a comprehensive description and the manifestation lacks
a collective title then RDA instructs us to record the titles proper of the parts
as they appear on the source of information for the manifestation as a
whole and so since people usually know who Jane Austen as I gave you an
example of some of her works, Northanger Abbey, Lady Susan, The Watsons and Sanditon and this is how you would use ISBD punctuation, the international
standard punctuation, to separate out these individual titles. And then here’s
the title page and here is how you can do some of the MARC variant titles.
Normally we don’t add 246 variant titles. I show you the coding in field
245. Notice subfield b comes after a semicolon and then you just list
whatever your next title part is, in this case Lady Susan, make
sure you capitalize each one of these titles, and then the best access
according to the policy statements is to add a 740 02 for these parts
and then / or a 700 12 – that gives it even better access when you say this work
contains Jane Austen Lady Susan or Jane Austen Watson’s. So again it’s optional but you wouldn’t have to add a 740 or a 700 for each one of
them. The only one that is actually core for library of congress
is the first or predominant one in the collection. So these are kind of
difficult I think. They’re not easy at all but just be aware that you do not
give a preferred title so you should not have a 240 on this record because that
would be incorrect to say that all of these works are represented by
Northanger Abbey for example. And then here is a collective title but it’s got
the Raven by Edgar Allen, it’s a non collective title. There’s no title that
represents the resource as a whole. Instead you have the Raven, you have
the courtship of Miles Standish, and you have Snowbound and they’re all by
different authors. Here’s the 245 field with an example. Because these stand
apart, they’re not by the same author, the international standard bibliographic
description punctuation is a period. You separate these out by a period and you
record the statements of responsibility with the titles themselves. Now this is
not ideal and this is not easily searched in our catalogs so in this case
if any of these were important to you at all I would definitely encourage you to
add a 505, enhance it if possible and 700 12s for every single one of them, all
the analytical entries, and then honestly probably the Courtship of Miles Standish
might be pretty prominent or you might consider it prominent – I would add that
but I would also add Snowbound. I would add all three of these if possible.
Remember they don’t have to be authorized, and you can also just add
them as 740 if you think your users don’t really care about the author. If
all they’re gonna look up is Courtship of Miles Standish, add a 740. That’s fine.
[Okay and here’s an example of a manifestation lacking a collective
title for a DVD. So here is the container like I said – usually for a
collective title or for a non collective title in this case, aren’t going to find
that on the title screens themselves so we see at the top, triple feature. Well
that’s not really acceptable as a collective title, so in this case we have
take the titles of the individual works that make up this collection as the 245 and we make sure to give access to each of the
titles individually as well. And also on this example, we might consider the
text on the back of the cover that stands out – that’s actually a pretty
decent collective title – so we may want to give that as a variant if people are
likely to search under Trail Blazers three rough-and-ready Randolph Scott
westerns – it’s certainly more descriptive than just giving the titles of the
individual films. Now we want to share with you that you can email us your
questions right, but we also will share some definitions of
these titles we talked about today. We know that not all of you have access, so
we’ll share this. These are the actual instructions for alternative,
parallel, other title, for example and then we also want to point out what some of the policy statements look like, and in RDA they’re freely accessible and what you need to do is go to the
accessing Library of Congress program for cooperative cataloging policy
statements – it explains that you go to the RDA toolkit and then you have access.
All of you have access to the toolkit policy statements here. These are free. So
when we look up the variant titles down here it’s two point three… this is what
it’s going to look like… but there’s lots more information here. There’s all the
examples. So lots more examples than we can show you in one hour! Are there any
questions? [Andrea and Thomas I just wanted to thank
you, and we do have one question in the chat box which is what does the term
running title mean?] This is a good time to show you OCLC bibliographic
formats because they usually have a pretty good example, so here’s the MARC
246 field variant form of title, here’s running title, so second
indicator 7 is used for running title. Usually when you actually look down at
the examples they’ll give you an example that makes sense but basically if you
were to look in… if you were to
say pull up a HathiTrust record or just any old book that you actually have
it, and here, we’re in this book… and then when you go to any page, here, a
running title would be a title that is displayed on every page or every other
page either at the top or at the bottom. And so something that would be typical
is like the 9/11 report that came out from the government, probably that’s not
the official name at all – it’s a popular name – but it could be a running title
name and provide great access. Any other questions? [I don’t see any other
questions. I’m going to go ahead and have Lisa stop our recording and I’m going to
go ahead and share the LEU certificate.]

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