Evergreen Indiana 2016 Spring Cataloging Roundtable


Good Morning! My name is Monica Boyer. I’m with the Jackson County Public Library. And Mary Kay and I are going to split up the roundtable today. I’m going to begin by talking about Item Status I know that Item Status is probably going to be a review for a lot of you, but there are some things hidden in there that I don’t know if everybody knows about, so I want to share what I know. And then we’ll get into to something more interesting like Copy Buckets. Item Status has a wealth of information. It’s helpful for circulation; it’s helpful for cataloging. Circulation data: you can find check out dates, check in dates, obviously the current status, number of circulations, if you’re looking at
weeding. And if you’re a cataloger, which we all should be, you can find your pricing, your shelving location.
You can even find the MARC records. So there’s all kinds of good stuff that you can find from just this one screen. So we’re going to explore it a little bit. You can access Item Status from many places, the first and most obvious is from the splash screen. In the middle column, the “Item Status/Display.” But, unfortunately, all the other places you find it, it’s not always called the same thing. So the splash screen: “Item Status/Display.” You can also find it in the search menu, where it’s called “Search for copies by Barcode.” In the Circulation menu, it’s called “Show Item Status by Barcode.” In the Cataloging menu, it’s called “Display Item.” So all of these are the same thing, but they all go to the same place. So you can access Item Status from any of these. You can also do which, what I do a lot, is use the F5 key. This is a quick, easy way to turn any tab into Item Status. Be aware that when we migrate to start using the web client more later, I don’t know if the F5 is going to continue to work, but it does right now. And also you can get to Item Status from the OPAC View. If you’re looking at a record, down by the barcode in the center, you’ll see a “View” hyperlink. And if you click on that, that will bring up your Item Status. So we’re gonna talk a little bit about everything that you can find in Item Status. We’re going to start with the column picker. I hope everyone is aware of the column picker all over
Evergreen It’s in Item Status, but it’s in a lot of other places. Mary Kay may mention it when we talk about buckets. It’s in Holdings Maintenance; it’s in all kinds of places. But I hope that you know that your column picker is there and what all you can find in it, because then you can set your display up to show any types of information that you want. There’s an enormous list of options are available at the, um, column picker. It depends on what you’re doing. Which ones you might want to display . For
catalogers, you’re probably going to want the Barcode number, maybe the circ modifier, owning library. If it has a monographic part, you can turn on the part thing so it’ll tell you which part it is. Then so there’s all kinds here that you might want to use. I would suggest using your Number in List because as we work in batches, which Mary Kay and I are going to discuss, it’s nice to know how many items are in your list. But there’s lots of things you can turn on or off any of them you like by checking or unchecking. Currently, this is set to have an alert message, the call number, the due date, location, status, and title all displayed. But if we wanted to change that, we could go to our column picker and add in whatever we want.
Say, I do want to see the circ modifier. So, we’ll check that. The other thing that you can do is change what order your columns are in. Yes, maybe you want to see all this information, but you want maybe the title to be front and
center. So you want to take it to the far left. All you have to do is click and drag, and then you
can put the title wherever you want it. Maybe you want the status right up there too. So
you can click and move it wherever you like. So you can rearrange these to whatever order
you want. They will stay this way while this tab
is open, but, as soon as you close or reload this tab,
those are going to change unless you save them. So I’m going to tell you where you can save your
column preferences. In the upper right you have the Actions for
Catalogers menu, and the Actions for Selected Items menu. Both of
those menus, at the bottom, have a Save
Columns option. Also the Actions for Selected Items menu is
available by right clicking on an item in Item Status And the in the lower left of the screen, there’s a
button that says List Actions, and there the option
is called Save Column Configuration. All of these options will save which columns you
have chosen from the column picker to be
displayed And they will save the order of the columns and
the width of the columns, because you can
change the width. I also want to talk about copying to the clipboard. This is a fantastic feature that I love. You can, if there’s any data that is being currently
being displayed in your Item Status, you can put
that on your clipboard, so you can paste it into a document, paste it into an email,
whatever it is you’re needing, so you don’t have
to write down the information you need. So you can do this in a couple of places, both in the upper right, again, just like the Save
Columns, the Actions for Catalogers and the
Actions for Selected Items menus both have a Copy to Clipboard link at the top. So
you can use that, and again if you right click on the item, the Actions for Selected Items will
show up and you can use Copy to Clipboard from that.
Also we mentioned the List Actions a minute ago, In the lower left, the List Actions buttons, there’s
Copy Field from Selected Row to Clipboard. All of these things will do the same thing. They
will put them on your clipboard so you can paste
them wherever you want. I just want to show you how that works in case
you’re not aware. OK, we have Harry Potter and the Deathly
Hallows. You’ll see that my columns are still how I changed
them a minute ago. That’s because I have not
reloaded the tab. And I have not saved them, so when this goes
away it’ll go back to the default that they were. But if I want to copy something from this row, say
I want to put the barcode into an email, the
barcode has to be displayed here, so if what the information you want is not displayed
here, you’ll need to turn it on your column picker. But in this case, I want the barcode, so I’m going
to… In my case, I’m going to right-click, because I
right-click a lot, and just Copy to Clipboard. And you’ll get this little pop-up box. This box has
every column that is currently being displayed
and this item’s information for that column. You’ll notice that the information is hyperlinked, so
if you click on that once, it just goes away and it
doesn’t seem like anything happens. But it does put it on your clipboard, so now you
can paste it anywhere you want, in this case into
a Notepad file. So copying to the clipboard is a great feature if
you need it. I want to discuss the Alternate View. What you’re looking at now is the List View, and
this is generally what you default to when Item
Status comes up. But there is the Alternate View. There’s a button
near the upper right–I’ve got it circled here–that
says Alternate View. This will show you differnt and more information
about your item. So I’m going to go through the different parts of
Alternate View. First of all, there are 4 different tabs in Alternate
View, and we’re going to go through each one. But all 4 of them, no matter which part you’re
looking through, they always have this grey bar
at the top. It has the title, the author, some basic
bibliographic information. It’s not about the item
itself; it’s about the bibliographic record. You can see who created this bibliographic
record, who lasted edited it, and when. And all that in the grey bar is just the bibliographic
record. And you’ll also see up there is where
your TCN and your Database ID number are. So that’s a good way to find that if you’re needing
to share record information with other librarians
or coworkers. So the first….now, like I said the grey tab is going
to be there all the time. Now we’re going to
discuss the different tabs. The first one is the quick summary. [Software
recording failure results in brief gap.] …the day it became active, the last time the status
was changed. In the third column you have number of circs,
which is divided out in a nice way. It’s got total circs, plus it shows you how many
circs it’s been so far this year and last year. And you can see the last check in and check out
workstations, last time they were checked in and checked out. So this is some really good circ
data. But I do want to show you something that I just stumbled upon and I think it’s great! If you are in Item Status–and we’ve still got Harry
Potter up here—this is one of my library’s older
copies of Harry Potter, so we’ve had it for several years. You can see that in those years it’s circ-ed 49
times, and so far in 2016 it’s circ-ed 4 times and it
circ-ed 10 times in 2015. This is all really good data for if you’re trying to
determine whether it’s time to weed and item or
not. But what is also very interesting is, if you hover
over your Total Circs it will divided it out by year and show you where
all the different numbers are. So which years are the best. And this is just
something I stumbled upon so I just think it’s really
cool! So it can be handy if you’re looking at circulation
data. So we will go back That’s the Quick View, er, the Quick Summary.
There’s also the Circulation History tab, again this
is a lot circulation data, but you can get the information about the
last two circs that have been on your item. There’s the Holds/Transit tab. Again, circulation data, but it can be useful if
you’ve got an item that’s gone missing. Maybe
find a lead on where it went. And finally the Cataloging Info tab has the MARC
record right there which is a nice way to get a quick easy way to get to your MARC record
if you have an item [and you want to check] if the
item matches the record without having to pull up the OPAC. So it’s a really
handy way to get to that. So now we’re going to talk about putting, excuse
me, putting items into Item Status. Most obviously, you can put the barcode number
into the blank there and hit submit. You can type in;
you can scan it in from a scanner, a barcode scanner. But I want to
discuss the other option which is Upload From
File. Upload From File is a great way to get a bunch of
barcodes into Item Status all at once without
having to type them all in or scan a bunch of barcodes.
So we’re going to talk a little bit about how to do
that. First of all you have to…you can only use .TXT
files and .CSV files to be uploaded to Item Status. You can use them from Excel or Notepad. But
there are certain ways you have to do it, and
we’re going to talk about those. If you have an Excel spreadsheet, there is
always all kinds of other data in your
spreadsheet. It may be the column headings, the names of your
columns. It may be other data that you don’t need
like we obviously need barcodes for Item Status, but
you don’t need the title for Item Status. So you
need to get rid of all that extra information. Then you need to sav your file as a Tab Delimited
file or as a CSV. You have to do that. The other option…you either do those things or
you can copy and paste all your the bar codes
into Notepad and save it from Notepad so you’re not really using Excel. You have the
information in an Excel but you’re not really
importing an Excel file into Evergreen. So we’re going to…I’m going to demonstrate this
real quick. So, we’ve got a fresh screen. I have this Excel sheet of barcodes and items. You’ll notice that my barcodes are in scientific
notation, not in real numbers, so we are going to reformat those ’cause
Evergreen won’t know what to do with those. You can see there’s a bunch of data in here that
we do not need. So you need to take out any
columns that do not have barcodes in them; so we’re going to
take out the call numbers, titles, everything. I also need to take out the column headings,
because Evergreen will think “Barcode” is a number that it needs to find. And
it’s not. So you will delete that. Ok, now I am going to save this to my desktop.
Because I need to be able to…it has to be saved somewhere before I can upload it to Evergreen.
So, I am going to save this. I’m going to just put it on the desktop. I’m going to call it “Example Barcodes.” And I also…you’ll notice that there’s no extention
after my thing. You need to save this as either a
CSV, a comma delimited, or a TXT, which is a tab delimited file. When I made this file, I saved it as a CSV, so this
one is already a CSV, but sometimes you may
have to add the extension and put .csv or .txt so it will
save properly. Well, .csv if you’re in Excel. So I’m going to go
ahead and save this. It’s saved to my desktop. It might warn you that you might lose some stuff,
but say yes, you want to keep using it. So, now say someone emails you this list of
barcodes and you want to put them into Item Status so you can look them all
up, whatever you need to know. So, to do that,
you need to click on Upload From File. And then you find wherever you saved it on your
computer. I saved this one to the desktop. And open that. And it will throw all of those
barcodes into Item Status and tell you when it’s
done,which is really easy! Personally, I usually use Notepad to do this. If I have…if I have this report, someone sent this to me, or I got it from
Evergreen or whatever, and I wanted to import it
into Evergreen. I would not use Excel. All I would do will be highlight all the barcodes,
then I don’t have to delete the other data. I can get just the barcodes I need. I’m going to
copy them, and I would paste those into Notepad. And save this. Again, I’m going to save it to my desktop. I’m going
to call it “Example Barcodes” again. But this is a text file and the other one is a CSV,
so they can both exist. Ok, so now I have a Notepad file. I still have my
Excel file; it still has the titles, the call numbers, all the important things. But I have
taken just the barcodes and put them into
Notepad. And saved it here. So then if we want to import this into Evergreen
instead. It works the same way. Upload From File, find it, and here’s my text file. And uploading it. In my opinion, it’s quicker and easier just to copy
and paste them in from Excel into Notepad and
then save them there. Then you don’t lose anything from Excel. So, this is how we upload. I do want to point out
though that we have the “Trim List” checkbox at the bottom left. When
you’re working in batches or uploading like I was
just doing you should make sure that that box is unchecked. The one that I just uploaded only
had 18 items, so it wasn’t a big deal. But if it had
been a bigger bucket and had more than 20 it would only display 20, and if this box was
checked, it would only display 20 at once, and
the first ones as they moved down the list would fall off. So if you had a list of 100 items, by the
time the list was all imported, you still only have 20 items, so be sure that’s
[un]checked. I usually leave mine off all the time. The other thing that you can do with this data,
once you have it in Item Status, we talked about
columns, you can choose diffferent columns to display. But you, and you can change the order
of them. You can also sort this. So, maybe you want to put these in alphabetical
order by call number so you can have a pull list. If you click on the column heading, it will put it in
order, and so now we’ve got the low numbers
first. Maybe you want it backwards, you click on it
again, and then you’ll have a backwards list. able So you can sort things by clicking on the…the
column heading, which can be pretty handy,
especially if you’re trying to find a specific title in a whole list,
you can alphabetize by title and find what you
need. Ok. Now we’re going to talk a little bit about what
actions you can do once you’ve imported all
those barcodes into Evergreen. …into Item Status. The first, there’s Actions for
Selected Items which you can use either from the menu in
the…the menu button in the upper right or by right
clicking on the item itself. And you’ll get practically the same menu. There
are a lot of options here, and we already
mentioned Save Columns and Copy to Clipboard, but there are other things that are handy in Item
Status. Showing in catalog, so it’s good way to get to the
OPAC with the record for this item. Editing your items; you can make… Edit one item or edit a bunch to make…to change
them all in some way, if you need to change a price; need to change
your circ modifier, whatever. Mark…marking things missing, marking things
damaged. There’s some circulation type things in
here: aborting transit. You can also add items to buckets, which Mary
Kay’s going to talk about in a few minutes. So there’s a lot of things here you can do, one
that I would point out of that I don’t know how many…how often it gets used,
is the Request Item. You have….maybe one of
these items you want to put on hold. It says Request Item, but it is really just a hold, so
if you have Request Item, it will come up. It will ask for your barcode. And it
will tell you it’s a copy hold, and you can choose
the pickup library. This will automatically place a copy level hold. which is great, because what if you want to
place copy level holds on a few different items,
maybe you have several different volumes here or something. So you can highlight all these at
once and do Request Item. And you can create several holds, all at once,
several copy level holds in one action. So that’s pretty handy! Then there’s the Actions for Catalogers menu. Which again, we talked about Copy to Clipboard
and Save Columns, but there’s a lot of other
options. Some of these are also available in the menu we just looked at, the Actions for
Selected Items, but some of them are not. Some of the same Edit Item
Attributes, mark things missing, add items to
buckets, all kinds of things, but then there are a few extra
things that are more for catalogers: such as adding items, editing volumes, deleting
volumes and items. So there are some things in here you can do too,
again you can do them in batches or for one item. I do want to caution you on editing volumes from
Item Status. Editing Volumes from Item Status is really easy,
and it’s a great option, and even if you’re doing it in batches, it’s a great
option. But you need to be aware, that if you edit
a volume in Item Status, and there is another item on the same volume, it is going to change the volume on that other item. So then whether you wanted that other item’s call
number to change or not, it has been. You just
changed 2 call numbers for 2 items at one time. So just be aware of that when you’re using Edit
Volumes. And then finally, I’ve mentioned a little bit about
doing singly or in batches. We can…Item Status is great for working in
batches. Or you just have a one-off item you
need to fix. Or you can do some of both. I uploaded that whole list of 18 items, but maybe I
only needed to change 2 of them. So if I wanted to do that, I could just highlight the
two that I like, or that need to be changed, and then I can right
click and either use this or use something from the Actions for Catalogers menu.
I’m going to use Actions for Selected Items, and
edit my item attributes. You can see that it just is showing me those two
items and their data. I’m going to say, “No, these
are both dvds.” And modify the copies. It will reload those two
items and you can see…well, I don’t have my Circ
Modifier thing up here. You can see that these are both dvds now. Whereas they were books. Or you can change a
whole list at once by selecting everything, I’m going to make them all books now, because
they are all books. It might take a second to load,
but you can see that it lists every single item that’s in the
Item Status. And I am going to change these all to a circ
modifier of book. So now we know that
everything in Item Status is book. And we modify it. It should reload the list, I
believe, yeah. And give you updated information, and says, “Look they are all books!” So you can work in Item Status just for a single
item or doing a bunch at once, which is also what you can use copy buckets for. So,
Mary Kay is going to work on copy buckets and
talk to you about that. Good morning! I’m Mary Kay Emmrich. I’m the
Director of the Newton County Public Library, and
we catalog by my preparing A/V and original cataloging and our Assistant Director, Jen
Arrenholz, catalogs copy cataloging. So
cataloging’s always been kind of a… a very close task in my heart and in cataloging, I learned how to manage copy
buckets. And some of you may be saying, “What the heck
is a copy bucket?” Well, in Evergreen a copy
bucket is a virtual container that you use to batch process items or
bibliographic records. And that’s straight from the
Cataloging Manual . Copy buckets are used to perform all sorts of
maintenance tasks in batch. And they’re also used to manage copy or item
information. You might use copy buckets to change the status
or shelving location of group of items for period
of time, like if you’re moving items to storage if you run out of shelf space, if you’re trading parts
of collections between branches, which we’ve
done, if you’re marking items that are part of a display,
and you want them in a bucket because you
know those items are on display. To make permanent changes in the status of a
group of items, copy buckets can be used for
that. You can change shelving location. I use copy buckets for deleting. I like it because it
kind of gives me a track record. If you have leased items, you can used copy
buckets to track those. If you lease books or
books on cd, placing them in a copy bucket will allow you to
batch delete all or some of them when you return
them, and it makes that tasks simpler. Or you can use copy buckets to collect items for
a project: if you’re preparing a special collection,
or a list. And you’ll see, I have a special collection later on. Copy buckets are great for that. There’s lots of
ways to access copy buckets. The big “C” on the
splashscreen stands for Copy Bucket. You can also drop down the Cataloging menu and
select Manage Copy Buckets. From the Edit drop down menu, you can select
Copy Buckets. And again, the phrasing is different, but the
action takes you to the same place. It takes you to the copy bucket. The copy bucket has two parts; the top screen is
the Pending Copies. Those are the copies that you’ve scanned in in
this action, when you’re particularly working in
that copy bucket, and you’re getting ready to move those items,
pardon me, to a bucket. The bottom half of the screen is your Bucket
View, and you can adjust the sizes of those
screens. If you rest your mouse over this line you can adjust the size of the two screens. Again you have a column picker, like Monica
talked about, with some of the same selections and that column picker will impact pending copies
only. You have to use a separate column picker to take
care of the Bucket View. To save your column configuration, you go to List
Actions, and you do that in both the upper and
lower screens again. You can create your own bucket and you need to
name that bucket before you can save it. You can also choose the buckets
that you’ve made previously. These are buckets that I work with, this is my
Cat2 login that I use, and I have books to delete,
books to train with, chapter books, and we have three locations, so I
have buckets related to those individual, pardon
me, those individual locations. Another way to pull up a bucket is by entering the
bucket number. And you can share buckets that way by knowing
the bucket number. And that is listed right here. In the Bucket View, you have the bucket number,
the name of the bucket, and who owns or
created that bucket. And so, in this screen I would enter 8142, and that would open up the Roseland Discards
bucket, which is what’s happened here. We keep a list of copy buckets and who created
them and their numbers so we know what buckets we have out there, so we’re not
recreating buckets, so we’re not junking up our copy bucket statuses and creations. I don’t
need four or five training buckets, and, yes, I
have a bucket entitled “Just a bunch of stuff!” And that’s one that I play with and tinker with,
how I originally learned to use copy buckets. So if you ready to add items to buckets, you can
add via Pending Copies in the bucket manager by
scanning them in at the top of the screen. You can add via Holdings Maintenance, and that is part of the drop down menu. You can also add via Item Status. In Pending Copies, you would scan or key in your
barcode number, pardon me, in this box and
select submit, and that would add the items into your Pending
Copies area of your copy bucket. If you leave copy buckets at this point, these
items will disappear, and you’ll have to scan them
in again. You must move the pending copies that are in this
part of the bucket, in the top half of the screen, into an actual bucket in the bottom half of the
screen for them to remain in the bucket when you
return to this screen. You can add item buckets from Holdings
Maintenance, which is… I love to work in Holdings Maintenance! Holdings
Maintenance just pleases me for lots of reasons! And you can right click, to add items…this is adding to buckets through
Actions for [Selected Rows]. It’s also available under Actions for Selected
Screens [sic]. You can right-click Actions for Catalogers…You
can click on Actions for Catalogers and select the
second item which is Add Item…Add to Item Bucket. Which is…item
bucket and copy bucket are interchangeable
terms. That’s one of the theings about Evergreen, is that
we have two or three ways to go down every
street. It’s nice because we’ll develop different
techniques and fortunately the phraseology for the 2-3 different phrases sometimes differs and makes things a little confusing. You can also creating a a new bucket to add
items to. If I’m working in Copy Status…Holdings
Maintenance, excuse me, and I decide, I need a bucket for these Conrad
biographies. I can create a bucket right then and
there. By selecting item…adding items to the bucket from
either the adding… Actions for the Item Record, er, Actions for the
Selected Record, and I can select “Create a New
Bucket.” And at that point I can create and name a new
bucket. In copy buckets, in the bucket status screen,
there are a variety of statuses. There are 4 main statuses that you can
view. The first is Show Status. And it opens the Item Status screen; it allows the
user to use all the functions of that screen. You can transfer one item to specific volume; that
allows you to transfer the items in your bucket
one, or several, or all to a different call number at your local branch or
at another branch. And first you have to mark the call number you
wish to transfer to as an Item Transfer
Destination, just the same as when you transfer through
Holdings Maintenance. And you can check Chapter 10.7 in the
Evergreen Indiana Cataloging Training Manual for
more information on that. You can edit Item Attributes; that allows you to
make batch edits, if you’re moving books from
one shelving location to another, for example, you can do that via Edit Item Attributes. You can
also Delete All from the Catalog, and that deletes
all items which is useful for weeding. I’m going to choose one of my buckets, which is called the “Training Bucket,” and there’s
lots of materials in here. Most of these are the same book if you notice by the title
designation, but they have lots of different
locations. They have several, various call numbers. And so
I first I want to get these all in the same location. So to do that, I’m going to edit the item attributes
and I click the button. And as you can see from my working screen, I
have a variety of item attributes, that really don’t all relate to this book. This book is
not a western; it’s not a children’s chapter book. So I can edit these simply by clicking on my
location collection information. So I can also go to templates, and I’m going to
move these to the NWPLL History Room I’m going to click on that selection and apply it. At
that point it loads the parameters that I already have set on
that template which puts it in the History Room. Which is wonderful; that’s where I want them! It has them as non-circulating, which I don’t want
them to circulate. They’re not holdable. They are
books, monographs that they are not $50.00 apiece; they
are $10.00 apiece. So I’m going to change that. And yes, they are considered reference. The
owning libraries are correct, of course, because I’m not going to change that
here. I’m simply changing the location. When I modify that, and it goes back to my copy
bucket… I’m going to refresh my bucket. And it will have all my items in the History Room. So using item…editing item attributes through the
copy bucket is a good, fast way to correct items that you want to correct. Now I want to delete, oh, the ones that have the call number
“HISTORY.” So I’ve selected them. And… Oh, I have to Delete All. I can show the Copy
Status and delete from that screen. So I can do a batch delete like Monica talked
about, and through Actions for Catalogers, I can Delete
Items. Now, when I go back to my copy bucket and
refresh, it shows me that some of the items are deleted,
some of them aren’t, but it also keeps that item in my copy bucket. It
has not disappeared. So if I want to leave this
bucket alone for now, and just exit out of copy buckets, when I return to
it, I can see what items I deleted, and perhaps
something has changed with that item or at that point, I know the item isn’t
being returned to the collection, and I can remove the selected item in the bucket. And that can be done as a batch by holding
control and making selections. And clicking on Remove Selected Items from
Bucket. I’m going to retrieve a shared bucket. Ah, there we go! Now I can go in and make changes to these
items, but I can’t remove them from the bucket,
because this is a shared bucket. This is created through my local administration
login. And if I want to remove that selected item, it
will tell me, my permissions are denied. But that’s a simple way to share the bucket, is simply by exchanging bucket numbers, which
is why we have the bucket grid that I showed
you earlier. But when you work with someone else’s
buckets, when you work with a shared bucket,
you need to stay in communication as to what’s happened with those items in that bucket when
you’re done with them, when you’ve altered
them. That other user may choose to delete the original
buckets and its contents, and you go in expecting
to work with that bucket and, boom, it’s not there. While you may perform batch functions shown at
the bottom of the screen, you mean not remove the items from the bucket. You can delete them,
but you can’t remove them. Deleting copy buckets is not the same as deleting
the contents of a bucket. This is throwing the
bucket out itself. Maybe like throwing out the baby with the bath
water? But if I’m done with a bucket. I’ve created a
bucket to use for some purpose or another, and
I’ve decided that I don’t really need this bucket anymore. Before I
delete the bucket, I have to remove all the
contents. It won’t let me delete a bucket that still has
contents in it. So if I want to delete the Chapter Books bucket…
I’ve used it, I’m done working with chapter books. It’s going to ask me, do I want to delete that
bucket? And it still appears to be there. When I drop down my list, Chapter Books is gone. You can create reports with copy buckets. They can be used to generate reports. You can
take the contents of your bucket and generate
circulation reports. There is a report available right now that Anna
created for me that is a copy bucket shelflist, and it lists the items in a
specific copy bucket. You can choose the copy bucket you want the
items to be reported upon, and generate a report that way. I do not know how to write reports with copy
buckets as the field of selection because I’m not a
good report person, so my recommendation is you contact Anna or
Jason Boyer to help you through creating a report
with your copy buckets. This is the report that… Anna’s report for shelf listing generates. It shows
the owning library, it shows the call number, and I
keep this to put in alphabetical order. This is the encoded barcode number. I have the
titles shown here, the authors, the status, and then the total circulation count. And I believe
that total circulation count is for a lifetime of the
book. That is not for the year. So that’s a total
circulation count for the lifetime of that particular
item. There are as many different ways to use copy
buckets is there are catalogers in Evergreen, so my recommendation is just to have bucket full
of fun!

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