Mapping and Mobilizing Assets in Your Community


>>Welcome to Mapping and
Globalizing Assets to Build Community. I’m your host, Andy King. Asset mapping describes the process of building
an inventory of the strengths and contributions of the people who make up a community
before you start any intervention. Asset mapping reveals the
assets of the entire community and highlights the interconnections
among them, which in turn, reveals how to access those assets. It enables people to think positively
about the place in which they live or work and challenges individuals to
recognize how other people see and experience the same community. Asset mapping is considered the essential
starting point to transforming the way that services and communities work together. It is also considered to be the first step
to enabling individuals and communities to recognize what resources
may be available to them. Asset mapping helps conceptualize
the things that communities want to improve whether they are physical, social,
emotional or cultural, how these assets or resources can be used may
then contribute to a plan aimed at making the improvements
that they have identified. No matter where you’re serving as a VISTA,
every community is filled with opportunities and local assets that can be
harnessed to meet community needs. In this session, you’ll learn how to
build upon the skills of local residence, the power of associations and the
supportive functions of organizations to foster sustainable vibrant communities. If you haven’t yet had a chance to take our
poll which is on the right side of your screen, I invite you to do that now
so we’ll have a better sense of who’s participating in today’s session. I want to introduce today’s team. As I mentioned, my name is Andy King. I’m a training specialist with the VISTA
program and assisting me today is Robyn Stegman, a project specialist at Campaign Consultation. We are here today to assist
you during the presentation and to help you get your questions answered. A quick look at today’s agenda. Well, we just covered the welcome
and introductions and we’re going to start the content really with an
overview, a Community Asset Mapping and Mobilization 101 type of overview. Then, we’re going to move on and look
at some of the steps that you can use to successfully conduct a
community asset mapping process. Then, we’ll give you some
ideas and show you examples of how you can put your community
asset map to work that is once you’ve created
it, what do you do with it? And then we’ll review some resources and
next steps before we take your questions. Now, I’m going to turn it
over to Shannon McGarry who is a project specialist
at Campaign Consultation. Shannon?>>Great. Thank you so much, Andy. And I am going to take a
few moments and go over some of the learning outcomes from today’s session. So, by the end of today’s webinar, you’ll
be able to articulate the advantages of asset mapping, sort of the
why this approach is a good one that you might consider using
as part of your work. You’ll be able to identify the various types of
community assets that exist in your community. And you’ll also have an opportunity to
know how to select the appropriate methods so that you can really conduct a vibrant asset
map in your communities so that you can figure out how best do you help the community to grow. We’ll be talking about strategies that you’ll
be able to employ to catalyze connections, build consensus and creatively engage
to [inaudible] partners in that process which will really help for sustainability. So we’ll be talking about ways for
you to create some shared division. And finally, you’ll be able to locate and
access opportunities for networking and support. And we have a great group
of presenters with us today. The first of which is Laura Bumiller who is
the director of Public Allies in Maryland and she has a lot of experience conducting
asset mapping and she’s a trainer and instructor at the University of Maryland
School of Social Work in Baltimore. And so it’s now my pleasure
to turn it over to her.>>Great. Thanks, Shannon. So, as Shannon said, my name is Laura
Bumiller and I am a proud VISTA alum. And I’m also a licensed social worker and I’m
on the faculty at the School of Social Work where I serve as the director
of Public Allies Maryland. And Public Allies is a national
AmeriCorps grantee. So, I have stayed in the
AmeriCorps sector for quite a while. So our niche in the AmeriCorps sector is the
diverse nonprofit leadership development. Our mission is to advance in new
leadership to strengthen communities, non-profits, and civic participation. So, our AmeriCorps members or allies
as we call them, serve in full time– serve full time in nonprofit or
public agency apprenticeships. They participate in intensive leadership
development training and team service projects. But more than just our ally program, Public
Allies is really a national movement grounded in the conviction that everyone leads. We believe that everyone can make a difference
and can work to inspire more citizens to believe in themselves, step up and act. We run our organization and operate all of our trainings using the
values-based leadership approach. One of our values is a focus on assets. And what we really mean by that is that we
think that everyone has gifts and talents to contribute to their community. And those that are often considered as clients
of service programs should really be partners and leaders in addressing public issues. And that surveys and change effort
should be accountable to those who have to live with the results. So, that’s why I’m excited to talk to you today
about asset mapping and building community. And I hope to provide a little
bit of that 101 for you all. So, I’m going to start with a poll. When you look at this glass,
is it half full or half empty? So, I’m hoping that poll will
show up for us in a minute here. Might switch over from the
questions that are up, in a second.>>Yeah, give it one second. We’re just waiting for the
other poll to close out. And so, another 10 seconds and
we’ll be able to start it up. [ Pause ]>>Well, my assumption is, is that
probably half of our responses are going to be half full and half of them are half empty. We can check back in a little while
and see as the answers start coming in. So, let me– I’ll just keep going. The truth is this is a trick question. My perspective on this glass
of water is that it’s both. And you know, I use this as an
example because every individual, every community is both half
full and half empty. We all have strengths and weaknesses. We all have assets and deficits,
this cannot be denied. The trouble is that many professionals enter
a helping relationship as I’m half full. The community where I’m working or the
individuals that I’m serving are half empty. And I’m going to work with them so
that my fullness fills your emptiness. And that– that does not engage the community
in defining and solving its own problems. And what it really does is
create a cycle of dependency. Social and medical research over the
last probably 100 years have shown that there are a few factors that have
the most far-reaching and powerful effect on the psychological, social, and
physical well-being of people. These factors are based on the degree to which
people feel or have a sense of community, a sense of control, adequate
resources and connections to other networks for resources and exchange. So, if we aim to create change in communities,
if we ignore these things and come in and help communities without allowing the
community members to have that sense of control, and have their own connections to resources,
we’re probably doing more harm than good. OK. So, let’s take a look at this more closely. Many professionals use a needs-based
approach to community change. And what that really means is that
they’re trying to create changes in the communities through increased services. They’re putting nonprofit
organizations, for-profit hospitals. They’re putting services in the community. But that means that the leaders then in the community are professional
staff, people who are paid to be there. And that money is the key resource and if
the money goes away, those services go away. So, if you approach community
change from an asset-based one, that means that you’re changing the
community through citizen involvement. And therefore, the leaders are widening
circles of volunteer citizens and that people in relationships are the key resource. So, even if people move in and out of the
community, if there’s a large enough web and more and more people enter that
circle of leadership, then that– those services, those changes
are never going to go away. So, an asset-based approach begins
with getting to know your community. I want to take a step back and define community. That’s one of those words that
we used a lot in this work and it can mean a lot of different things. And I’m sure all of you who are VISTAs are
working with very different communities. Often, you know, we think about
the community as being place-based, people who are brought together
by geographical boundaries. But communities can also be based on interests,
you know people who share the same interest or passion, it could be a practice, it could
be an action, it could be circumstance. People are brought together
in lots of different ways. So it’s often easiest to use examples based
on place-based communities like neighborhoods. So we’ll go through that for the
rest of the webinar that way. But it– the first step in the process if you were using an asset-based approach
is really defining your community. So the practice of getting to know
your community is often referred to as community mapping or asset mapping. Don’t let this confuse you. You do not need to make an actual map. This can actually be somewhat
distracting if you’re working– if you’re not working in a geographic community. So mapping really just means
identifying the assets. So what are assets? I take– you know– what do I
mean when I say the word asset? So take a look here at the screen. I know this might be a little small for you. But this shows a wheel of the community
with six different pieces of the pie. So these are different categories
of assets here. So I’m going to start in the top
right, I think this is a purple piece of the pie, it says Associations. And then further out next to that,
there’s a list of examples of associations that you might look for in your community. Things like book– or block clubs or
business organizations, environmental groups. So as you’re creating an
asset map in your community, I would suggest that you
actually write specifics. So you would say, the Mount
Vernon Neighborhood Association or the Sierra Club of Greater Maryland. So, that you actually have
specifics for those associations. The next piece of the pie there is Institutions. These are things like schools
and hospitals, libraries. It’s really a public or a private organization
devoted to the promotion of a particular cause, especially those of a public
educational or charitable nature. So, larger universities or the
public library, things like that. You would always want to take a look out. They might serve a wider area than just
your community, but if they’re based in your community, they’re going to have–
they’re going to be a big player there. The next piece of the pie, I think
it looks a little yellow, is Economy. So these are the assets that make the
money and the resources go around. They’re the for-profit businesses, they’re the
nonprofit organizations, they are philanthropy, different development corporations
in the neighborhood. So you want to take a look at all of the
businesses and economic resources that exist within your community, whether
they’re formal or informal. The next piece of the pie, the turquoise one
as we’re going around the circle, is Stories. So Stories is probably one of my
favorite assets and it’s the hardest one to identify during asset mapping. These are things that help define
the background and the history of the community that you’re working in. It might be things about how the
community started, it might be traditions in the community, like there’s always
the– in the neighborhood where I live, which Fells Point in Baltimore, Maryland,
has the Fells Point Fun Festival every year and this goes– it has a long tradition of
pirates because back hundreds of years ago, Fells Point used to build a lot
of the privateers ships for– during the war for the United States. And so we have this history of pirates and
that really kind of defines our neighborhood and unites the people and helps people
feel connected to the neighborhood. So often, there’re stories like that that help you understand the
community where you’re working. The next category of assets
on the wheel is Physical. This is on the far left. So these are the physical spaces where people
can come together, where people can meet. So gardens and parks, playgrounds,
different types of housing or streets that are important landmarks
for your neighborhood. And remember that everything is an
asset even vacant lots or buildings. You never know if that vacant lot could be
turned into a community garden for your project. So make sure that you’re keeping
track of everything that you come across that could be useful for your project. And the last category of
assets up here in the top left, I think it looks like a pinky
orange, is Individuals. So this is actually where
you just list the individuals that you’ve come across in your work. You know, I would suggest that
you write down specific names and even include their contact information here
so you have it all stored in the same place. You know, so this is like Principal
Brown from the elementary school or maybe it’s Susan [assumed spelling] who’s
the president of the neighborhood association. So you want to keep track of the people
that you build relationships with. And you can use this as brainstorming
when you’re trying to create your project. So, I do want to make a note that some of your
organizations or assets, some of your items or people might be listed under more
than one category, and that’s OK. Your elementary school in your
neighborhood is for sure an institution, but it’s also a physical space if you
need to hold meetings in the cafeteria. So, you know, try and think creatively
about the assets that you’re identifying as you’re figuring out what
role they play in the community. So, the next question is, how do we
find these assets in a community? And, you know, I’m going to come back
to the difference between a needs-based and asset-based approach here to
really hit home on this point. It’s hard to find assets if you
are looking for ways to help. If you’re looking for ways to help, that usually
points you towards needs in the community. I share this one example of a needs-survey
and a gift-survey on your screen as a way to collect information– or this is a tool
that you could use to collect information. I’m sharing this particular
one to highlight the fact that your entire approach must be
grounded with a focus on assets. And really, a belief that diversity and
inclusion are important for community health. And I just want to note that there
are many tools available not just, you know, these two sample surveys. There are many tools available that you can
use to help collect information and we will get to that a little later on in the presentation. So looking at your screen, this needs-survey,
this is an abbreviated version obviously, but I have seen these actual
questions in a department of social services benefits interview. You know, these are questions
about what people lack. Do they lack adequate housing? Are you in need of a high school diploma? Do you not have the job skills you need? Or, you know, they ask, “Do you have,” about
negative questions, “you have a criminal record? Do you have a history of drug abuse?” And what these questions help you find needs,
deficits, areas where people are lacking, areas where you could bring services
in to fix their problems for them. So now, we don’t want to
ignore that people have needs. Trust me. Those needs will become obvious
to you as you work in a community. But by asking about needs, we position ourselves
as the answer or as the solution to those needs. In order to create a truly healthy,
independent, self-sufficient community, assets need to be identified and
mobilized so that people have control, have a network to turn to, and do
not become dependent on a system. So here’s an example of a gift survey,
here’s an example of how to find assets. You can ask about the gifts that people have. What positive qualities do people say you have? Who are the people in your
life that you– gift to you– that you gift to and how do you gift to them? Or, what do you give that makes you feel good? Questions like that. You can ask questions or ask
people about their skills. What do you like to do that
people would pay you to do? Have you ever made anything? Have you ever fixed anything? What do you enjoy doing? And then lastly, you could
ask questions about dreams. This is things that don’t yet
exist in the community but might. You know, if you could snap your fingers
and be doing anything, what would it be? What are your goals for this community? What would you like to see happen? And, you know, a question like that might
show you what’s lacking in the community, but it will also show you what’s possible. And it’ll help motivate people to
bring about that change themselves. So to put this all back into context for you,
there are five steps of the ABCD process. I’m referring to– ABCD stands for
Asset-Based Community Development. And this process really comes out of the
ABCD Institute at Northwestern University and that will show up as a
resource later on in the PowerPoint. We’ll give you some links. So there are five steps that they refer to. The first is mapping the community
which we’ve just talked about. The second is building relationships. So it’s getting to know the
individuals there, establishing trust. Third step is to mobilize the community
for growth and information sharing. So that’s connecting community members to each
other, connecting those assets to each other, so that they can start working
together and build their networks. The fourth is to bring together the
community to develop a shared vision and plan. This is about their dream, right? So getting the whole community on board and identifying the dream that
they want to bring to life. Then last is leverage resources to
support the community’s development. You know, there is a possibility that you bring
in outside resources, but it’s best to start with a resources or the assets that
are inside the community first. So recognize that these steps
are not linear steps but also as do need to happen to be successful. You might have to go back and work on
earlier steps or maybe you’re working on multiple steps at the same time. For example, sometimes it’s hard to learn
the stories and identify the individuals if you haven’t built relationships yet. So, you know, you might work on these
different things at different times. So, and as quickly as I could, I was at about
15 minutes that was an asset map overview. It looks like our polls come in 85 percent
of you do view the glasses half full. So we’ve got a lot of optimists in
the crowd here which is really nice. Hopefully, this asset-based
approach is ringing through with you. So I think that’s the end from me. I think we are going to open it
up for questions, is that right?>>That is right. It looks like one question that we have is that,
is an asset-based mapping approach best utilized when financial resources are somewhat available
in the community versus a needs approach?>>You know, I think that an asset-based
approach is almost always preferred over a needs-based approach. I think that even when financial resources
are scarce, that is a reason, you know, you can sell that to funders
and try and bring services in. But, you know, more than likely, those
resources are going to run out at some point. So you want to make sure that you’re having this
asset-based approach to community development so that you can leverage the resources
that exist even if they’re not financial to start solving the community’s
problems for itself.>>Great. One moment, I think
we have one more coming in. Can you give us a real life example
of how these processes work for you?>>Well, I think that the next couple
of presenters are going do that and in much more in-depth than I will. I’ll give a very quick example. I had a team of AmeriCorps member a couple
years ago who wanted to work in a community where they were, you know, they were working at
a nonprofit there, and had this blank wall space and the team just got really excited, wanted to
paint a mural on the wall, decided what was best for the community and went ahead and painted it. And two days later, it was covered
in graffiti and they realized that the community didn’t own this mural. They had no idea what it was, they didn’t care
about it and therefore, they vandalized it. So they actually went through a process of
pulling out the neighborhood kids together. They had a focus group over several months and
they asked the community what they wanted to do with the wall space there at the
building that used to be an eyesore. And then they got the kids involved and the
kids painted a picture of the community. So it was there a representation of who
they were and who they wanted to be. And that was five years ago
and that mural is still there.>>Great. And we have one more
question before we move on. Are there a nationally-based asset
mapping surveys you can refer us to, to use for asset building research?>>Sure. If you go to the ABCD Institute website
which I think we’ll put up at the end here, there is a couple of different
links within that– within their website, it
has tools and resources. They have a textbook written by John McKnight
and Jody Kretzmann that has multiple, multiple examples of surveys that you can use. So, in addition to ABCD, there’s also a
school that’s called Appreciative Inquiry that actually comes from
organizational development, really. But the Peace Corps has an adaptation to apply
appreciative inquiry to community development. And so if you Google Appreciative
Inquiry, you’ll also find samples of questions that are appreciative.>>Great, great. I will pass it back over to Shannon.>>Great, thank you very much Laura and Robyn. So now that we’ve had a good overview and
an introduction about what asset mapping and mobilization is, we’re going to really dive
into the nuts and bolts and the considerations for us at mapping so that we can really
determine what the steps are and help you figure out how to go through that process. And so, there are several
different steps for asset mapping and these steps involve both setting
up the infrastructure to manage and maintain the asset mapping process, as well
as doing the actual work of mapping the assets. And so really, it’s important that you’re
gathering together a local group of people that you can lean on to help organize
the community approach and also to provide leadership for followups
and to make sure that the work that you are doing is sustainable
moving forward. Really, what you need to consider first
is determining what your purpose is. The second you’re going to need to
do is to build your infrastructure. And then think about what assets you’re
going to be identifying and inventorying. Finally really, what the map is so
that’s about building the relationships and drawing the connections between– connections between assets and
the individuals that are involved. And then finally, how you’re going to put that– the assets to work and utilize those so
that you can really advance your projects and build the community. So the first thing that you’re really going
to want to do is to identify why it is that you’re doing an asset map and develop
a purpose goal for your mapping project. You’ll need to be able to define what
you want to do with the information that you’re collecting and this is where
you can start to think about what some of your measures of success are going to be. So you’ll need to be able to define, for
example, it might be that by May 1st, we will connect with 25 neighborhood
associations and develop a formal structure for participation and use
development activities. It’s important to keep in mind that your mapping
goal is different than the overarching goal of the project in which you will be
using the asset mapping information. So your mapping goal will really focus on
connecting with people that you want to involve with the implementation of
your overarching goal. So start with what will be the end of your
statement and then name the focus or activity that other people and associations
will be able to help to implement. And then you’re going to want to choose what to
be done– what will be done about your focus. So are you hoping to develop
something, to improve, to enhance? You want to consider some of the answer– or
answering the questions, who are you seeking to involve, how many people do you
need to help you to achieve your goals. And what is it that you’re asking people to do? You want to make sure that you’re choosing
an end date for your mapping project, so a schedule of timeline is always good. For ease, I recommend using a time period
that would begin within, so within 12 months because that provides some flexibility. And remember that you want to have a goal
in mind about what you’re going to do with the information that you collect. So, keeping in mind, are you going to
be creating a community resource guide, are you doing– hoping to develop a searchable
database of different community resources that you can tap for future initiatives? Perhaps, you’re trying to link individuals
with paid or volunteer opportunities or possibly link your communities
to future opportunities. So given all of those tips, are there
particular mapping goals that you might develop? There’ll be a prompt in the
chat that’s coming up shortly. And so go ahead and share any mapping goals
that you might have in the chat feature. Once you’ve determined your purpose and
really set your goals, you’re going to want to move to building the infrastructure. Thinking about sort of anything
you need, some strategy and a plan to make sure that it is successful. So some things that you might want to consider, who’s going to be responsible
for managing the process. Is it going to be you, somebody
else in the organization? Who is going to be directing the engagement
process once the mapping is complete? So sort of what’s the followup plan? Again, defining your communities,
so what’s the geographic focus? Do you need to have addresses, zip codes? What are those boundaries? Who is going to be part of your advisory group? Do you need additional funds? Is there a plan for storing the data? So, these are just some of the
things that you want to kind of keep in mind as you’re getting started. The next thing, once you have
your infrastructure in place and you’ve defined your community and figured
out what your goal is for your asset map, you’re ready to start the process of
identifying and inventorying the assets. And we’ve already talked a little
bit about what those assets are. So, think about what it is
that you need specifically in order to make your project a success. As we’ve mentioned before, it’s
really not a linear set of operations that you can easily scale our
roll– scale up or roll out. Really it’s about engaging and building
relationships so that you are able to enable strength, capacities
and abilities to be identified and developed for positive outcomes. And so there’re lots of different
methods that you can employ to support the identification
and collections of assets. And you just want to make sure that
you’re including both the tangible such as your physical assets, parks,
community centers and churches, as well as those that are intangible. So, experiences, skills, knowledge and passion. It’s more than just about gathering
data, it’s about making sure that you’re promoting new connections,
new relationships and new possibilities. And so now I’m going to introduce
Toria Schrayer, who is a VISTA with the Greater Homewood
Community Corporation and she works as a parent organizer at a local
public school in Baltimore, Maryland. And she has just gotten started with
the asset mapping process and is going to share a little bit about her experience
with identifying and inventorying assets. So, I’m going to turn it over to Toria.>>Thank you Shannon. So, like Shannon says, I’m working at a local
community organization, working with parents and families and the administrations of a
local public school to try to look on a lot of researches and parent engagement in the school getting parents
involved in academic school. So, where this comes in with the asset map is
looking at the local community and what it has to offer to the– both the local community
to school and the school to the community, building the bridges between them. There are a lot of really wonderful assets
in the community that may not be obvious if you don’t start looking for them. There are local businesses and churches,
people who are very dedicated to making spaces and resources for families
or all kind of things. You see some pictures that I’ve collected
through my process on the screen now. So, like I said, a great deal of my
time has been spent with this project. The goals were to create
bridges between the school and the local community in both directions. Finding out how the school could
be a resource for the community and the community a resource for the school. And again as with the end
goal of creating resource– research [inaudible] for families
of the school it’s also a great way to get these folks involved in the school,
to engage neighborhoods in the catchment area that may not have been as
involved and engaged previously. And that had some of these on challenges
that I’ll talk about in a minute. It also has a lot of rewards
as it comes together. So I think that there are a lots of assets in
community and the very first thing that I had to start thinking about was–
oops, all right, there we are. Right slide now. The first thing that I had to start
thinking about was to involve in the process and so the obvious answer [inaudible] involved
in the school already, so that’s parents, administrators and the school staff, teachers,
anyone who’s already in the building volunteers. Because of the connection between
the school and the community, as in involving parents whose
children are not at the school. And, you know, those from the community who
don’t have parents, artists in the community, local businesses and churches, you
know, the folks around the gardens and have art installments, people who
are in the community doing things. And so it sort of filed up because at the end of
each conversation that you can have with someone in the community, it’s very
simple to say, “Hey, you know, while I’m doing this project,
who else should I speak to?” And everyone has an answer of someone
that they think you should talk to next. Everyone knows someone and
that goes back to connections between people and mapping people as assets. And they’ll be able to tell you, you know,
quickly what that person can do to help. So I hope that helps at the
whole setting a process bit. Of course, it can be a challenging process
so there’s a lot with striking a balance between the time that you spend on it
and the information that you’re getting. So it takes a long time to have
in-depth conversations with people. And in-depth conversations are really
where you get the bulk of your information. And the community incredibly helpful, it does
though take a long time to get that information. It can be very frustrating when
you schedule meetings and folks for whatever reason are not
able to keep your meeting. And there’s not always a
lot you can do about that. At some point, instead of doing phone
meetings as well which did help, although again that [inaudible]
balances in-depth versus time commitment. And something that I thought one
of you had a question about earlier about keeping individuals positive and hopeful and this goes back to balancing
needs and assets. A lot of times, people will walk into, you know,
if you ask someone to meet with you to talk about research within the community,
they’ll go in sometimes saying, “Oh, there’s nothing here and things are terrible.” And ask for questions like what
do you hope for, for the future? Or if you have unlimited resources,
what would you do with that? What would you like to see in the community? And oftentimes, you’ll find out well, there this really wonderful space
it’s just that there’s no programming. Or there’s, you know, these people
doing [inaudible] same things but they don’t have funding. And what can came come out of that
are these resources that are there, they are assets that people sometimes
don’t have as much perspective maybe on how that’s actually a good thing. So, it has been a successful process. I’ve found new ways to engage with
population [inaudible] in school and artists from the community who had never set
foot into the school is, you know, setting up as a volunteer there
and is interested in bringing in art programming at no cost to the school. There are lots of really exciting
things that are coming from that. One of the things that I found to be most
helpful was staying flexible and redesigning like my surveys and my questions very early on. When I first started, I was asking specifically
about researches to families and I found that that limited me to only a small
amount of resources in the community where really there are spaces that are
being used by family groups and by people in families who– that I was not being
told about when I asked about family assets and to sort of could be as broad
as possible and keep narrowing down what we just talk about at the beginning. And it’s amazing, the connections and resources
that were less obvious in the community. And how those sort of came out and
are now available for resource guide. So it’s a little bit about
my process and there you go. And the lessons that I learned most from
this that I’ve also shared with today are that resources and assets
exist in every community. They’re there even if you don’t see them. People’s needs are going to be met. They are being met currently. It’s just how they’re being met. There may be things that
need to change absolutely. There are things that are helping
people to get by to get what they need. There are assets there. All you have to do is find out what people
are passionate about, what they’re doing and to start looking into those things. It may not be a formal– you know, it may not
be a formal library but there might be someone who has a lot of books and is, you know, letting
people borrow them or it might be someone who doesn’t have a formal daycare center but
is always, you know, baby sitting a few kids. Whatever it is, there are always resources in
a community and people needs are being met. Everyone is passionate about something. If you find out what matters to them, that’s
what they share, that’s what they can bring to you and that’s what they can use to
help get other people involved and engaged. So, I hope that helps and good
luck in your projects as well.>>Great. Thank you so much, Toria. That was really helpful and sort
of give a different perspective. And so, you know, how do you go about
identifying those assets and how are you going to be having those conversations with people
so that you can really get the nuts and bolts of what their dreams and hopes are for the
community and what they can bring to the table. And there are lots of different strategies that
you can employ and really you want to make sure that you’re choosing the right strategy for
the task that’s in front of you and that sort of what our Donald Duck look-alike is looking
to do as he is trying to figure out what to do with that in what could be a fax machine. And so, most communities, one place to start
is really to look at some of the previous works that your community may have done. Some of the old processes or activities
that might have included things like community planning or economic
development, program and service development. So, what other community asset
maps have been done in the past. So, you know, what worked and what didn’t work. There’s often something that’s happened
in your community that you can draw upon to get some of that historical perspective. And so, you know, you might want to think
about how you can find that information. So, once you’ve established what’s already
been done, you can start to talk to colleagues in your organization to identify
individuals or associations and institutions that you’re already working with and those that
might be good to establish relationships with. You can review public sources
such as newsletters, newspapers and bulletin boards for directories. Google Search is a great tool to employ, don’t
forget Google Maps, we know which can kind of pinpoint areas that are within your
defined community and showcase what’s there. You can do a quick walk through
of your neighborhood. Speak with people door to door,
so doing a canvass-type situation. You know, that’s a great way to have– build relationships and discover
some of those hidden assets. You can schedule interviews with leaders
of associations and institutions. Find out what community groups are meeting
and who are activists within the neighborhood and community and you can have
sit down conversations with them. So, if there’s something going on at a local
library or, you know, a local cafe or bar, those are some great places to have
some good and formal conversations. And then also, well, telephone surveys
might not be as popular as they used to be, you can always look at community LISTSERVs
or doing some texting campaigns to kind of identify some additional hidden gems. So, in the prompt, go ahead and share any other
ideas that you might have and what we’re going to move to now as sort of putting it
all together and how you can really– you know, once you’ve identified
and inventoried all of your assets, how do you draw the connections and
links to start to build relationships between the individuals,
associations and institutions that you’ve uncovered in the community. So, maps are a great visual
aid, but that’s only one way. There are also strategic connections charts and
so what we’re going to do now is sort of turn it over to do a quick community activity here
with a white board so that we can think about the different types of possibilities that
there are for relationships and partnerships to help us to meet our community goals. So, I’m going to turn it over Robyn, who’s
going to take us quickly through a process.>>OK, thanks Shannon and I’m pulling up, you should see now a look at
some strategic connections. So, at the center is you and your
organization and some other places like local residence and schools. So, what I’m going to kind of look from
the chat here to build our asset map. So, if you can put, what is one kind
of institution in your organization that might be an asset that
you want to connect with? [ Pause ] All right, so I see the example is churches. I see people are talking about the military
or veterans– a community center– what? Community center. All right so, take these
examples and what are some ways– enter into the chat now what are some
ways that you could connect with, let’s take for the example,
military and veterans. What are some ways that connecting
with them might help your organization? [ Pause ] OK so, I see here if you’re
trying recruit volunteers– [ Pause ] — employ them. [ Pause ] They can help recruit other community members. Help with training. That’s a great one. Leadership training or other
training from their service. All right so, you start to get an example
of how you can begin to build those– that map that might not be a physical map, but show the different strategic connections
you can make around different assets that you’ve identified in your community. So, I’m going to go back
and turn it over to Leah. [ Pause ] Leah, are you with us?>>All right, here I am. Sorry, I was [inaudible].>>OK. No worries.>>My name Leah Brow and I’m
currently serving as a VISTA leader. I’ve served two terms in Cleveland, Ohio. My first term was at the Cleveland
Food Bank working on snap extension and enrollment snap formally or
informally known as food stamps. And then my second term has been
with Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry, working with our non-shelter and
developing job training programs through small social enterprise businesses. And in both of these terms, I’ve really had
to, you know, utilize the community around me to really promote my programs
with the food stamp enrollment. It was just getting access out
to everyone and finding all of the potential clients and people eligible. And with my second term, developing businesses,
I mean, they’re very dependent on the community for costumers and our products
to be used and our resume streams and pretty much every piece of our business. So, one of the tools that my current
director has really utilized in his terms that has been helpful for kind of developing
these asset maps is the SWOT analysis. So, four things you’re trying to kind of
identify once you have your goal in mind. You want to really look at what your strengths,
weaknesses– looks like it moved back– what your strengths, weaknesses, opportunities
and threats to the– you know, your end goal, what you’re trying to accomplish are. So, our first social enterprise in my
second term as a leader, we have a business that manufactures and installs
utilitarian-style bike racks in Cleveland. So, our strengths, we got our initial funding
because there was, you know, local competition and nobody else was making the products that
we are making in Cleveland, so that was great. We didn’t really have to worry about, you know, being competitive with a lot
of other very similar products. It’s also, you know, Cleveland has been
embracing green transportation and things like that and it’s definitely a [inaudible]
idea, bike transportation in general. So, we knew that going forward with a bike-friendly business would be generally
a strong point in such a progressive city. Weaknesses would be just that there’s– ’cause some community members wouldn’t
want invest in this sort of things. Also, not everyone needs a bike rack. Our major competition when we started
was trees and poles and other things that people could secure
their bikes to but, ours– you know, our costumers aren’t
going to be buying the bike racks. It’s going to be businesses that
want to attract bike customers. So, looking at a diagram like this, it really
helped us figure out who we should be trying to connect with to get our
bike racks to be sold. Opportunities from there and we’ve reached out
to cyclist organizations, people who would want that there to be more safe places
for cyclists of their bikes. We reached out to businesses that
had a lot of cyclist costumers and that would be looking to draw more in. And we’ve been wound up partnering with some
people that were in need of getting off the code with new bike parking regulations
and stuff like this. So, we try to really hone in on who
would be interested in our product and what we were trying to do so we
wouldn’t be spending a lot of time reaching out to people that, you know, might not really
have any interest at all in working with us. And then threats, we– where we’re afraid
of reaching maximum saturation we’re in a large city but it’s not, you know, so big that we can just continue making the
same bike racks without changing our product. So, we really sort of have to be aware
of, you know, our new expansion and going into different cities or how we can really
keep growing and be sustainable in the future. So, you know looking at this, those were
the examples for just my current project of the bike rack business, but this sort of thing can really help you identify
those relationships worth pursuing. So– and the next step, where do
you start with this sort of stuff. I found really good luck
in both my terms starting with my host site to go back to an example. For my first term, I was working with the
Cleveland Food Bank and they have hundreds of food pantries that do
feeding programs with them. I started meeting with the people who worked and
managed those agencies one-on-one just to see, you know, what their client base looks like. Was it mostly families, was
it mostly single people? I was trying to get a feel for, you know, the people who were 130 percent below
the federal income guidelines, I mean, the federal poverty income guidelines. Those are the people that were eligible
for my program, so I was trying to find out where they would be, who has
access to them or interacts with them and who could help them sign
up for this program. So they were all very helpful and to echo
something that Toria said during her piece, every person I talk to was eager to tell me the
next place to look or the next person to talk to and the next, you know, connection to grow from. And so, you know, the host site was great
because I was in new VISTA just out of college and my supervisor and my coworkers already had a
lot of connections for people that already have that strength, the initial interest
to engage with me and connections to people I was looking to reach. So after I developed a lot of networking
opportunities from talking, they’ll be, you know, contacting my host site,
I started going to networking events and just being very public about what I was
doing and what my project was and I found that a lot of people were willing to
come to me and ask me more questions. I try to find what the strengths
for the community are in my program and project them out. And chances are, there are other people
that are trying to do this very same thing. They have a similar end goal and they’re
looking for people to work with to, you know, make their project happen, too. So if you’ve got a project where there might
be a lot of shared interest in your community, you talk about it, probably people
will want to engage with feedback. And the third big tip I have is know your
neighbors [inaudible] of this leader, I’ve gotten a lot of larger events that have
started of a little shaky but gained strength by reaching out to neighbors
just around my organization. We did a large neighborhood cleanup day and
just went out to inform businesses and all kinds of organizations and groups around us of just
what we were doing and we got so much support and donations for supplies and all kinds
of stuff just because those people, [inaudible] social service organizations or doing exactly the same sorts
of things, things we were. They have that shared interest
because they were in the same area. And the last thing, just record everything. Write it down. I’ve been trying through my term just to
keep this as easily recorded for the people that are going to be, you know, coming after me
and so on so just make sure you write everything down ’cause the next business
will love those resources that you’ve collected during your term. So, that’s all I’ve got for
my tips for asset mapping. I hope that this was helpful. And I hope that you all have great luck
developing your own asset maps of your own.>>Great, thank you so much, Leah. This is some really great points about,
you know, establishing the relationships and building connections to make your
asset maps more powerful and really to leverage those assets in the community
so that you can advance your projects. Now, I’m going to turn it over to Asma Peracha
who is another VISTA leader and she’s going to share a little bit with us about her
experience but then also, how she’s planning to leverage and utilize those resources as
part of her project within Michigan GEAR UP. So I’m going to turn it over to Asma. [ Pause ] Asma, are you there? [ Pause ]>>Yes. So as– thank you for the introduction. As you said, my name is Asma
and I work out of Detroit, Michigan with Michigan’s Gaining
Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Program,
also known as MI GEAR UP. And GEAR UP is– just to tell you a little bit about our program before we drop
into the asset mapping project. GEAR UP is a federal grant offered to the
US Department of Education and the State of Michigan won its third GEAR UP grant in 2011. It’s a 23 million dollar grant
matched by state and local funds. And the GEAR UP model is to follow a cohort. So we follow a cohort of student starting from
seventh grade through their first year college. And our cohort will be starting high school in just a few weeks this fall
so it’s an exciting time. And MI GEAR UP aims to provide college
access programming to increase the number of [inaudible] students who are
prepared to enter into [inaudible] and post-secondary education
as well as the workforce. And as you can probably guess,
this is a really large task. So we partner with all 15
of our public universities to provide the college access programming
that is needed for this to happen. Our university partners to
finish schools in their area to provide services including [inaudible]
entering, college visits and camps, some exposure, and financial literacy. And one of the really great things or I should
say, one of the many great things about MI GEAR UP is that there is a state office. And so, [inaudible] has the
ability to kind of work centrally and coordinate [inaudible]
collaboration and initiative. And this summer, because we had 10
summer associates from AmeriCorps as well as our usual 14 AmeriCorps VISTAs,
we just [inaudible] that one of the statewide initiative we wanted to
organize was our asset mapping project. And to give you a little bit background
about our project, it really started when 1 of our 15 university partners, the
University of Michigan Ann Arbor, their former VISTA [inaudible] was
given the assignment by her supervisor, Dr. [inaudible] of creating an asset
map for the [inaudible] community that the [inaudible] MI GEAR
UP program works with. And it totally started where I’m
sure many of you looking are today, where she knew very little about
asset map and how you create one or how to use one once you created it. [Inaudible] like you, she was a quick
learner so she did a lot of research and she eventually created a
really, really impressive asset map. Not only does she looked the asset in the
community, but she also include demographics of the student population she was
working with, as well as stated goals and values and a mission statement. And in fact, her project was so impressive that
MI GEAR UP decided we need to really take this and implement it on a statewide level. So we had to come in and train our other– train
the rest of the MI GEAR UP AmeriCorps team, our VISTA and summer associates
in how to create an asset map. The MI GEAR UP AmeriCorps
team has been working on maps with the local communities
throughout the summer. And the idea is that when you take all of these
different asset maps with the local communities and you put them together,
you have a statewide map. And I’ve told you a little bit, you know, that
was a little bit about what we did and I wanted to share with you also why and how we use
to– how we hope to use that asset map. So as you can see looking at this map,
MI GEAR UP is a truly statewide program and this map shows all of our university
partners and like our [inaudible] partners, there were local feeder schools in the area. And this model is very effective because each
university partner can really pillar their MI GEAR UP programming to the needs of their
local cohort and their local community. But what we want to do in addition to
this individualized programming is ensure that there’s a [inaudible] continuity and
our MI GEAR UP site throughout this day in terms of the services that they offer. So this [inaudible] MI GEAR UP student
moves from one area to another, they can find similar services in the
MI GEAR UP programs in both areas. And just because the student has moved, they
don’t lose access to this MI GEAR UP services. So the goal with our asset map is to
organize some map by these services that are considered part of MI GEAR UP. And if there is a service that is not
currently offered via MI GEAR UP site, they can look at their map and see
how to best address this issue. For example, if a MI GEAR UP does not
currently offer tutoring for our students, their asset map can help them via in
local resources that do offer tutoring, or can help find resources that would
facilitate them providing tutoring. And they can also cross-reference the
statewide map to improve current services. For example, one of our universities, let’s say
Michigan State University offers a really great and a [inaudible] tutoring program and the other
universities has learned to grow [inaudible]. They can look at the asset map from
Michigan state and see what other resources that the MI GEAR UP program that Michigan
State is using to provide tutoring. There’s something similar in
our area that we can also use and this will really take these already strong
individual MI GEAR UP programs and just build and improve their current programming efforts. And to conclude, I wanted to share
one of our promising practices for going through this asset map project. So one thing we can do our internal evaluation
team is send out a list of definitions from MI GEAR UP services to all of our
university partners and for example, when we say MI GEAR UP provides
tutoring, what does tutoring mean or what does financial literacy mean, or what do parents services
mean, what does that consist of. And this is crucial for everyone to have
a [inaudible] definition of the services that the asset map are looking at and I would
really encourage anyone who’s creating an asset map to create this list of definitions
that will be important for everyone to be on the same page before create– or
they attempt to use an asset map. So thank you for listening and I hope that gives
you a brief overview of what MI GEAR UP has done with asset mapping in a statewide
level as well as why and how. And if there’s time, I think
we’ll take questions.>>Great, thank you so much, Asma. Before we open up for questions, just
going to quickly wrap up, you know, what’s really important and what we want to
emphasize today is not only that you want to begin to map the assets in your community
and really draw those strategic connections between the individual resources and
organizations, but then also, you know, how do you put that to work so that you
are able to leverage those resources to support your community projects. And so you can do that through creating sort
of a shared vision and plan and setting goals and tracking the successes so that you
are making sure that those relationships and that those connections aren’t going to waste
and that can really sort of help you figure out which conversations that you need to
be having and with whom it makes sense to be having those conversations. And to really help to keep people engaged. And so as you’re going through, you
can think about how you can use those to help fund your proposals, connect
individuals to different types of volunteered or paid opportunities and then also create
some databases of resources that are available. And so, you know, next what we’ll
be doing is after today’s session, there are a lot of great
resources that can help you to conduct your community asset mapping sessions
to really plan and strategize around those and then also some tools that will
help you to mobilize those assets. And so after this session, we’ll be sharing
some steps and strategies, worksheets, a couple of different inventory
worksheets that you can begin to fill out, tips and best practices guide on community
asset mapping sessions, so how you might want to create those shared visioning
sessions and then also a guide so– on best practices for how to utilize assets. If you visit the VISTA campus, you can also– you’ll find the VISTA notebook that has some
information and then also the ABCD Institute at Northwestern University which the link is
there and also the appreciative inquiry form which Laura was talking about
earlier in the session. So all of those resources will be mailed to you. And we definitely want to
leave you with some next steps. So if you want to go off, you can start to develop your mapping goal
and asset mapping plan. Visit the resource sites and start
utilizing the tools and worksheets so that you can really develop your projects
and we are hoping that people can sort of use today’s session as a launch part–
launching point to start your mapping process and so we’re hoping that you
will share your successes and track your projects using the VISTA campus
forums and then finally, on September 9th, we’re going to do a followup webinar and
call so that we can recap some of the tips and strategies that we reviewed today
and then answer questions as you– that you might have as you’re going
through the asset mapping process. So, please mark that on your calendars
so that we can get that going. And thank you everybody. What we’re going to do now is
we’re going to pause and open up those lines for some questions. It looks like there’s been a couple of
really great questions that have been asked in the Q&A features so you can go
ahead and continue to ask them there. But Gwen [assumed spelling]
if you can open up the lines and tell us how to do that, that would be great.>>Thank you. [Inaudible] would like to ask a
question, please press star 1. Please record your first
then last name when prompted. To withdraw your request, press star 2. Once again, to ask a question
please press star 1. One moment.>>Great. And while we are waiting for those
questions to come in, I’m going to ask a couple of questions that have come in from
the Q&A for all of our panelists today. So the first question I have
is what are mistakes that you see eager young
VISTAs making in this process? [ Pause ]>>Laura, do you want to take that one?>>Sure. You know, I think the thing that I see
is just people racing in and being so excited to help and starting to talk to people and get
to know the residents that they just get excited and they come up with an idea
that they’ve heard and just want to start implementing it right away. And, you know, it’s this eagerness, it’s this
passion that I see in a lot of young VISTAs and it’s great and I don’t
want to tamper that down. But what ends up happening
is you start doing work for the community instead of with the community. So I– you know, I always urge the young
AmeriCorps members to just take your time. There’s nothing quick about this process. You’ve got to get to know the community first
and engage them and empower them to do the idea for themselves instead of doing for.>>Great, thank you. And do we have questions through the phone line?>>The first question comes from I
believe Paul Mack [assumed spelling]. Your line is open.>>Hi. I have question about
like doing a community profile. I wanted to know whether you thought you
could do both needs and assets together to understand the community more
holistically, especially if you’re trying to help the organization plan
future outreach to an area?>>Sure thing. Yeah, this is Laura. I’ll tackle that one again. I think that– you know, that’s why I started
with the glasses both half full and half empty. It’s hard to deny that needs exist. You know, and you don’t want to
ignore that ’cause, you know, I think they will impact your ability
to make change in that community. So I think, you know, remembering and keeping
track of the needs that you do see or the things that you hear is not, you know, off limits. I think you should keep track of what you hear. But the real point of an asset-based
approach is to make sure that you’re starting with what exists in that
community and figuring out a way that the community’s own
assets make up for those needs. And so, I think that’s get
confusing ’cause it doesn’t– ’cause when you look at things in a
community, it’s not a black and white. This is either a need or this is an asset. It’s just a way of looking at the community. Remember the example I gave
about a vacant lot, right. So if somebody comes in with a needs-based
approach, you look at that vacant a lot and say, this thing needs to come– be cleaned up. I need to get my core of volunteers from
across town to come in and just clean up this community or clean up this vacant lot. So that’s a needs-based approach. But when you’re looking at the vacant lot from
an asset-based approach, you’re saying, “What– you know, what could happen here?” You go next door and you ask the person who
lives right next to where the vacant lot, “What are your dreams for this vacant lot? What do you want to see happen here?” So it’s not a black and white of you can’t put
needs or eyesores or problems on the asset map. It’s the lens with which you view the
things that exist in this community. I hope that helps and I hope that make sense.>>Yes, thank you. [ Pause ]>>Great. Do we have another
question via other phones?>>Your next question comes from
Kathleen Johnston [assumed spelling].>>Hi. Yeah. So my question is how would you
recommend presenting yourself to assets that you find in the community? So say you’re looking to find some
of the institutions and just sort of introduce the program and the
VISTA program in your organization. Do you recommend sort of having a tentative
idea of the vision where you want this to go, like I eventually want community-wide
network that will on its own promote access to public benefits. But right at the beginning, I don’t
have the completely cohesive view of how all these different assets work together if I don’t even know what
all the different assets are. So what you suggest is like
an introduction of letting or when you’re having these meetings,
the people for the first time? [ Pause]>>This is Laura. Does anyone else want to tackle that? [ Multiple Speakers ] That’s a really good question,
I think there is– it’s a multiple-part question so I
might have a multiple-part answer here. The first thing I would think
about is why you want to create a network of– for
people to access benefits? And really double check if that’s
exactly what this community needs. So I would, you know, really take that step back
and start asking around doing your asset map to make sure that that’s the
right answers for this community. Now, there are a lot of times when we are
paid professionals that will be tasked with the specific community
organizing objective. So if that’s the objective of your organization, I can definitely understand
why you need to work that way. So then in presenting yourself, make
sure you have as open mind as possible. There’s a lot of different
ways to find those assets. You know, that– it can be as simple as just
doing a Google search, using the internet, using the library, seeing what you can find
and read, and look up about the community. But really, you’re going to be most
successful if you spend time there. So it’s doing the driving towards, doing
a walking tour, it’s asking, you know, maybe the police officer or the mayor’s office
of neighborhoods representative, you know, whoever it is, the neighborhood association
member to give you a tour, and to point things out to you and tell you about how things work. And you know, I always say
with every person you meet, ask them who else they can introduce you to. I can’t remember– one of
the VISTAs was saying that, “There’s always a snowball effect with that.” So as you’re introducing yourself say, “You
know, I’m a member of this community and I’m– I’ve noticed that residents would like have
better access to benefits and I’m trying to figure out how we can create a
system here that would help do that.”>>This is Leah Brow. I think I might have a little bit of advise
or benefit access particularly when I did that in Cleveland, I tried to really
look at who else would benefit from there being increased access to
public benefits, ’cause it is something that some people do just have a negative view
of you might just realize that interacting with people, good or not, open
to that sort of thing, it just– it’s draining on both people’s
time a lot of the times. But I started seeing, you know, who would benefit from their being
more food stamps usage in Cleveland. The grocery stores would, so would the farmer’s
markets ’cause the Cleveland farmer’s markets take the SNAP credits as well. So instead of interacting with people though
it actually would be getting more customers and more money from there being more people
with that money to spend on food in particular and those conversations tended to be a
lot more present and if I could find a way that what I was doing would benefit them
too, they would usually listen to me and be a lot friendly and a lot more
helpful about that kind of stuff.>>Awesome thanks.>>Great, thank you. Right, I have a question from Elise [assumed
spelling] Miller, what metrics do you use to measure success in asset mapping?>>This is Shannon and I can take that one. And so really, what you want to think of
when you’re thinking of the actual creation of your asset map is thinking of it more in
terms of being an output, and sort of a tool that will help you to get to the outcome, so you
might be looking to see what the connections are but really be a measure of success would be
the number of new relationships that were built or how you are able to leverage those resources
in the assets and connections that you have to say, get more funding for your
programs or to recruit more volunteers. And so really thinking about
how it can be used as a tool to help you meet your larger project goal. And hopefully that will help
to answer that question.>>Great, thank you. And another question is so, VISTA has a
particular problem where they’re looking for a funding for a senior
citizen apartment building. But they haven’t been able
to get grants or loans. What are some specific assets that he might
look for in this community that could help him, you know, be able to get
that project off the ground?>>This is Toria. I can help to answer that. I think that the maybe, of course, funding
is important, but there’s probably a lot that you can do in your community
without funding in the traditional sense so there are probably people who
would be willing to help change. There might be someone I know a lot of
VISTA here in Baltimore City who was able to get space they needed for a homeless shelter. So she was able to start that program
for free [inaudible] volunteers to paint. You can approach businesses who deal on
construction equipment and some of the things to try to get, you know, windows
or whatever it is that you need. There are a lot of researches that well of course you might immediately
think of money and grants. It might be just as valuable to
try to fit together the pieces. Of course, in some ways, I can seek more time
but in a lot ways, it can also [inaudible] you and your program a huge amount of hassle
and not being able to get the funding. Have I answered your question?>>I’ll add to that.>>Thank you.>>This is Laura. If that’s OK, I’m going to add to that.>>Yeah.>>I think that’s a great response. And you should always start there and
then you should also think about looking for money from nontraditional sources. There’s only a limited amount of
foundations and grants to go around. So sometimes that’s complicated. So thinking about that economic category
on your asset map really go to the places in the community where this might impact them. You know, as we just discussed and
maybe going to the hospital and saying if we build the senior home, the seniors
won’t have to go your hospital as much. So maybe get a donation from them. Get a donation from the local businesses. Get a location– or donations from the
local sororities and things like that, so non-traditional places for funding.>>OK, thank you. We can take another question from the line.>>The next question comes from, I believe, Perry Golnic [assumed spelling],
your line is open.>>Hello, yes that was my question was
the last one, a couple of quick comments on all four self-sufficient communities. [Inaudible] had great ideas, but that’s
the only way we get the power back to the people from big corporations. Secondly, if we have government
NGOs, charitable foundations not able to solve our social problems in communities,
all of that is great work but we have problems that we can’t solve such as
the ones we’ve been discussing. My town is 800 plus people, a tiny town. The last housing for seniors, the
individuals who put in money lost money. The local hospital put in money, lost money. The city council is still
paying on the last one. And we have people just leaving
town ’cause there’s nowhere to live. I presented to the council this morning. Everybody is in favor of housing. But you can’t just get people to donate
a few lots and get together some windows. We’re talking about a million 600,000 dollars. Even if you get lots of lots and 450,000 dollars
block grant with no match, you’re still looking for someone to sign the bottom
line who will carry the loan. And they’ve had bad experiences. Is there any way– the only way I can see is
creating a social business and that’s under– it’s a person– 2006 Nobel Peace
Prize Winner Muhammad Yunus came up with a social business idea
where we– charitable fund– funding would go into a business
and there is no profit. They can get their money back, but after that,
it might go from one community to the next, something to look at for all your NGO
people and business looking in that area. But this is one I haven’t
been able to figure out. And I don’t know how we can get it. We have a need. We can’t solve it.>>Thank you, Perry, for your comments. I think your point about
Muhammad Yunus is great. And I think, you know, that might be– that’s a great example of looking for
unconventional assets as looking at, you know, obviously you’re looking
at a huge donation there. But there are micro-loan organizations
that are popping up all over the country. And in addition, there is also,
you know, kickstarter and some of those crowd funding campaigns that
are starting to pop as alternatives. So thank you for your comment and
we’re going to on to our next question. So our next question is,
do you have tips on ABCD when you’re not in one specific neighborhood. So how do you do asset– you know, what are some
tips for doing asset mapping for an entire city or for an entire region versus one community? And Asma, maybe you can give a couple of
tips since you’ve had experience with this?>>Yeah, that’s a really good question. Because the program is statewide, we did one
that’s statewide asset map and it’s something that can come and so [inaudible]
but the hard part is very trading. I would say the first [inaudible] in that
city, and that’s where kind of stories, the people part of that asset map comment if you
look back to that that project we had created. And I would say, the easiest thing to do is
just to start beginning to talk to people and especially if you’re going to
[inaudible] but you’re not [inaudible]. It’s just to talk to people and get an
idea of the resources and once you go from point A to point B, like OK, I’ve learned about this and
I go to this resource and I check it out, I write down the details. Ask them for further information and just
to continue one point to another by asking for advice and asking for instructions and
doing that at every place you’ll let to.>>Hi, this is Toria. If I could just add on– Asma, thank you. That was a wonderful response and I just
like to add on that even when you think that you have a very clear space, you know,
my school is in one particular neighborhood and one [inaudible] that I made early
on is whether to use the neighborhood that the school is in or
the entire catchment area. When I decided to use the entire catchment
area, one of the things that I found was that there were a lot of
resources that I didn’t know about even though I did it my
site for seven or eight months. And I found out about all these things that
were not in the immediate neighborhood but were in the neighborhood as children at the school. So the point to that is as long as you
have to find borders that are, you know, in Asma’s case [inaudible], in my case the
catchment area for the school or the city, in Asma’s case maybe, it might– it can be
beneficial to have more of a space to work from. Of course, you’re not necessarily going to
get as in depth with individuals within that or as many individuals per space as
you might fit with a smaller area. But I think that it’s in many
ways can be more of a benefit. And it’s just again starting off with
what you know and then, you know, asking everyone [inaudible] use to
talk to while you’re doing this.>>Great, thank you. And I think we’re going to take
one more question from the line.>>At this time, there are no questions.>>OK, then we’ll take one
more question from the Q&A. So although– one question is, although
asset mapping is not necessarily geographic, is it still important to have some
sort of visual map versus a list of assets at the end of the process?>>This is Shannon again, I can take that. I think that it certainly both helpful
in engaging for yourself and also for the larger community to really have a visual
so that they can start to see some of those connections and think about their community in
a different way and sort of shape, you know, transition some of them mindset especially if the community doesn’t necessarily
see some of those connections and what resources might be available, and so
sometimes, the visualization is the best way to uncover some of those hidden connections
and find patterns that have emerged that might not be what you were expecting
and can kind of help you to think about how you were going to advance
your project in a different way. And so I would certainly recommend that– you
know, that you do find a visual representation to map out what those assets are and what
those relationships are so that you can see that to get the patterns whether or not
that’s something that you do, you know, with using an existing map or if you
create one, or if you do something similar to the strategic connections
chart that we showed earlier. I think that all of those
are things that will help.>>Great, well, thank you
everybody for joining us. There is an evaluation that is open right now. So make sure you could take that
before you leave the session today so that we can have some feedback and figure out
how we can improve these sessions going forward and also, you know, what topics and what
tips we should include on future webinars. At the end, I just want to
thank you all for coming today. If you have any further questions, please feel
free to contact us at [email protected] Our next webinar will be “The Intersection
of Poverty, Race, and Health” and that’s with Dr. Blumenthal, who is
the first MD to become a VISTA so we’re very excited to have him on the 17th. As always, the ongoing learning page on
the VISTA Campus has a complete schedule of our VISTA webshops and all of the recordings
and PDFs of our presentation that we have done. So make sure to check there. We will be sending you a followup email
afterwards with the slides in addition to the great resources and tips
that you’ve shared with us today. So thank you very much and thank
you all of our wonderful panelists.

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